The response of invertebrate assemblies to grazing

The response of invertebrate assemblies to grazing Invertebrate communities were monitored in a controlled sheep grazing experiment on ex‐arable land on limestone and in nearby older calcicolous grasslands Results for vacuum sampling of Heteroptera and herbivorous Coleoptera are presented and compared with the responses of spiders, leafhoppers and leaf‐miners Invertebrate groups differed in their responses to grazing and grassland age in terms of species diversity, abundance, variability over time and the development of a specific fauna on short turf Leaf‐miner assemblies were most strongly determined by the effects of grazing on plant species composition, while spiders' responses could largely be explained by the effects of grazing on plant architecture Spider species simply accumulated over time, whilst leaf‐miners were the most labile group Spiders, leaf‐miners and leafhoppers all contained some common species restricted to old grasslands, whilst herbivorous Coleoptera and Heteroptera did not No single group demonstrated the full range of invertebrate responses Spiders, leafhoppers and leaf‐miners each showed useful features as “indicator groups'”, but more than one group should be chosen for study in the context of particular research projects http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecography Wiley

The response of invertebrate assemblies to grazing

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0906-7590
eISSN
1600-0587
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0587.1992.tb00020.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Invertebrate communities were monitored in a controlled sheep grazing experiment on ex‐arable land on limestone and in nearby older calcicolous grasslands Results for vacuum sampling of Heteroptera and herbivorous Coleoptera are presented and compared with the responses of spiders, leafhoppers and leaf‐miners Invertebrate groups differed in their responses to grazing and grassland age in terms of species diversity, abundance, variability over time and the development of a specific fauna on short turf Leaf‐miner assemblies were most strongly determined by the effects of grazing on plant species composition, while spiders' responses could largely be explained by the effects of grazing on plant architecture Spider species simply accumulated over time, whilst leaf‐miners were the most labile group Spiders, leaf‐miners and leafhoppers all contained some common species restricted to old grasslands, whilst herbivorous Coleoptera and Heteroptera did not No single group demonstrated the full range of invertebrate responses Spiders, leafhoppers and leaf‐miners each showed useful features as “indicator groups'”, but more than one group should be chosen for study in the context of particular research projects

Journal

EcographyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1992

References

  • Trophic diversity, niche breadth and generation times of exopterygote insects in a secondary succession
    Brown, Brown; Southwood, Southwood
  • Horizontal distribution of the spider fauna of intensively grazed pastures under the influence of diurnal activity and grass height
    Keer, Keer; Alderweireldt, Alderweireldt; Decleer, Decleer; Segers, Segers; De‐sender, De‐sender; Maelfait, Maelfait
  • Local colonisation and extinction during early succession
    Gibson, Gibson; Brown, Brown
  • Determinants of web spider species diversity vegetation structural diversity vs prey availability
    Greenstone, Greenstone
  • The relationships of plant and insect diversities in succession
    Southwood, Southwood; Brown, Brown; Reader, Reader
  • Grass flowers in the diet of Megaloceraea recticornis (Heteroptera Miridae)
    Wetton, Wetton; Gibson, Gibson

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