The reliability and validity of tasks measuring perception of rapid sequences in children with dyslexia

The reliability and validity of tasks measuring perception of rapid sequences in children with... Background: Claims that children with reading and oral language deficits have impaired perception of sequential sounds are usually based on psychophysical measures of auditory temporal processing (ATP) designed to characterise group performance. If we are to use these measures (e.g., the Tallal, 1980, Repetition Test) as the basis for intervention in language and literacy deficits, we need to demonstrate that they can effectively quantify individual differences. Therefore, questions of standardisation, reliability and construct validity can no longer be ignored. Method: We explored these issues in three studies: (i) 52 Dyslexics and Good Readers aged 8 to 11 years performed a task requiring perception of rapid sequences (PRS) based on the Tallal Repetition Test; (ii) a subgroup of the initial sample was retested on the task three to four months later, and after extended practice; (iii) a further subgroup then completed a rate of auditory processing task using a backward recognition masking paradigm. Results: With a standardised methodology, we were able to replicate previous results with the PRS task, and demonstrate moderate reliability of measurement across time and practice. However, there were large effects of exposure and practice, and the task did not seem useful for identifying absolute and continuing deficits in given individuals. Conclusions: Our results call into question the use of this type of task as an individual measure of ATP. Neither is it certain that it is capturing what is currently understood as ATP. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry Wiley

The reliability and validity of tasks measuring perception of rapid sequences in children with dyslexia

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-9630
eISSN
1469-7610
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-7610.2004.00313.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background: Claims that children with reading and oral language deficits have impaired perception of sequential sounds are usually based on psychophysical measures of auditory temporal processing (ATP) designed to characterise group performance. If we are to use these measures (e.g., the Tallal, 1980, Repetition Test) as the basis for intervention in language and literacy deficits, we need to demonstrate that they can effectively quantify individual differences. Therefore, questions of standardisation, reliability and construct validity can no longer be ignored. Method: We explored these issues in three studies: (i) 52 Dyslexics and Good Readers aged 8 to 11 years performed a task requiring perception of rapid sequences (PRS) based on the Tallal Repetition Test; (ii) a subgroup of the initial sample was retested on the task three to four months later, and after extended practice; (iii) a further subgroup then completed a rate of auditory processing task using a backward recognition masking paradigm. Results: With a standardised methodology, we were able to replicate previous results with the PRS task, and demonstrate moderate reliability of measurement across time and practice. However, there were large effects of exposure and practice, and the task did not seem useful for identifying absolute and continuing deficits in given individuals. Conclusions: Our results call into question the use of this type of task as an individual measure of ATP. Neither is it certain that it is capturing what is currently understood as ATP.

Journal

The Journal of Child Psychology and PsychiatryWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2004

References

  • Auditory temporal processing in disabled readers with and without oral language delay
    Heath, Heath; Hogben, Hogben; Clark, Clark
  • Developmental dyslexia: Specific phonological deficit or general sensorimotor dysfunction
    Ramus, Ramus
  • Impaired neuronal timing in developmental dyslexia – the magnocellular hypothesis
    Stein, Stein; Talcott, Talcott
  • Processing of rapid auditory stimuli in school‐age children referred for evaluation of learning disorders
    Waber, Waber; Weiler, Weiler; Wolff, Wolff; Bellinger, Bellinger; Marcus, Marcus; Ariel, Ariel; Forbes, Forbes; Wypij, Wypij

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