The relationship between cardio‐ankle vascular index and subclinical atherosclerosis evaluated by cardiac computed tomographic angiography

The relationship between cardio‐ankle vascular index and subclinical atherosclerosis evaluated... INTRODUCTIONIn 2010, nearly 800 000 Americans died of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal disease. Therefore, it is very important to detect these high‐risk patients in their subclinical status.Changes in vascular integrity and properties are implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Data from the Framingham cohort have shown that arterial stiffness correlates with the first cardiovascular event. There are several methods to evaluate arterial stiffness, with cardio‐ankle vascular index (CAVI) being one such method. Previous studies have indicated that CAVI has a significant relationship with atherosclerosis. Specifically, studies that compared CAVI with invasive coronary artery angiography or cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) indicated a significant relationship between CAVI and coronary artery disease (CAD). Although CAVI has been extensively studied and recognized as a tool to predict cardiovascular risk, most studies have been conducted in Asian countries. This is a pilot study to investigate whether CAVI can predict severity, extent, and burden of CAD by comparing results with CCTA in a US population.METHODSPatientsEligible participants were age 18 to 80 years and presented to obtain a CCTA for clinical reasons at the outpatient center of the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor‐UCLA Medical Center (Torrance, CA). From April 2014 to March http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Cardiology Wiley

The relationship between cardio‐ankle vascular index and subclinical atherosclerosis evaluated by cardiac computed tomographic angiography

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0160-9289
eISSN
1932-8737
D.O.I.
10.1002/clc.22695
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONIn 2010, nearly 800 000 Americans died of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal disease. Therefore, it is very important to detect these high‐risk patients in their subclinical status.Changes in vascular integrity and properties are implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Data from the Framingham cohort have shown that arterial stiffness correlates with the first cardiovascular event. There are several methods to evaluate arterial stiffness, with cardio‐ankle vascular index (CAVI) being one such method. Previous studies have indicated that CAVI has a significant relationship with atherosclerosis. Specifically, studies that compared CAVI with invasive coronary artery angiography or cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) indicated a significant relationship between CAVI and coronary artery disease (CAD). Although CAVI has been extensively studied and recognized as a tool to predict cardiovascular risk, most studies have been conducted in Asian countries. This is a pilot study to investigate whether CAVI can predict severity, extent, and burden of CAD by comparing results with CCTA in a US population.METHODSPatientsEligible participants were age 18 to 80 years and presented to obtain a CCTA for clinical reasons at the outpatient center of the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor‐UCLA Medical Center (Torrance, CA). From April 2014 to March

Journal

Clinical CardiologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2017

Keywords: ; ;

References

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