The quality of consumers' decision‐making in the environment of e‐commerce

The quality of consumers' decision‐making in the environment of e‐commerce It is very important that e‐commerce practitioners leverage the technological power (e.g., information control) of the Internet in order to provide consumers with the information they need to make purchasing decisions. In this study, it is hypothesized that, to improve decision‐making quality, the degree of information control should be matched to the degree of expertise of consumers. The experiment method was used to test the hypothesis, and 120 student subjects voluntarily participated in the experiment. The empirical results of the study show that experts perform better at decision making in high‐information conditions, whereas novices perform better in low‐control conditions. The results of this research strongly support the match hypothesis of information control. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology & Marketing Wiley

The quality of consumers' decision‐making in the environment of e‐commerce

Psychology & Marketing, Volume 23 (4) – Apr 1, 2006

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0742-6046
eISSN
1520-6793
DOI
10.1002/mar.20112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is very important that e‐commerce practitioners leverage the technological power (e.g., information control) of the Internet in order to provide consumers with the information they need to make purchasing decisions. In this study, it is hypothesized that, to improve decision‐making quality, the degree of information control should be matched to the degree of expertise of consumers. The experiment method was used to test the hypothesis, and 120 student subjects voluntarily participated in the experiment. The empirical results of the study show that experts perform better at decision making in high‐information conditions, whereas novices perform better in low‐control conditions. The results of this research strongly support the match hypothesis of information control. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Journal

Psychology & MarketingWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2006

References

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