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The Psychology of Environmentally Sustainable Behavior: Fitting Together Pieces of the Puzzle

The Psychology of Environmentally Sustainable Behavior: Fitting Together Pieces of the Puzzle This paper considers the main features of four general psychological approaches to the analysis of environmentally sustainable behavior (rational–economic, social dilemmas, attitude–behavior models, and applied behavioral analysis), and focuses on the problems inherent in applying each approach to this issue. It also details the utility of a holistic Social–Ecological Framework that I believe is useful for analyzing environmentally sustainable behavior. This approach draws on concepts from ecological psychology such as Gibson's (1979) notion of “affordances,” and shows how such a method can account for and help us understand the limitations of traditional psychological approaches to environmentally sustainable behavior, and provides a general guiding framework for the formulation of environmental policy decisions and intervention programs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy Wiley

The Psychology of Environmentally Sustainable Behavior: Fitting Together Pieces of the Puzzle

Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy , Volume 2 (1) – Dec 1, 2002

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2002 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
ISSN
1529-7489
eISSN
1530-2415
DOI
10.1111/j.1530-2415.2002.00041.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper considers the main features of four general psychological approaches to the analysis of environmentally sustainable behavior (rational–economic, social dilemmas, attitude–behavior models, and applied behavioral analysis), and focuses on the problems inherent in applying each approach to this issue. It also details the utility of a holistic Social–Ecological Framework that I believe is useful for analyzing environmentally sustainable behavior. This approach draws on concepts from ecological psychology such as Gibson's (1979) notion of “affordances,” and shows how such a method can account for and help us understand the limitations of traditional psychological approaches to environmentally sustainable behavior, and provides a general guiding framework for the formulation of environmental policy decisions and intervention programs.

Journal

Analyses of Social Issues & Public PolicyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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