The Principle of Nested Subsets and Its Implications for Biological Conservation

The Principle of Nested Subsets and Its Implications for Biological Conservation Abstract: The nested subset hypothesis states that the species comprising a depauperate insular biota are a proper subset of those in richer biotas, and that an archipelago of such biotas, ranked by species richness, presents a nested series. The pattern characterizes the distributions of mammals in three different archipelagos, and it appears more strongly developed among faunas in the process of, relaxation (landbridge islands) than in those derived by overwater colonization (oceanic islands). The generality of the nested subset pattern and factors that may produce it are evaluated using distributions of land birds in the New Zealand region. Monte Carlo simulations show that species composition of these insular avifaunas is highly nonrandom, exhibiting significantly nested structure. However, avifaunas on nine oceanic islands lack the structure typical of all islands together or of the 22 landbridge islands. Thus, distinctive patterns of species composition, as well as species number, may distinguish landbridge and oceanic islands. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

The Principle of Nested Subsets and Its Implications for Biological Conservation

Conservation Biology, Volume 1 (4) – Dec 1, 1987

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1523-1739.1987.tb00052.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: The nested subset hypothesis states that the species comprising a depauperate insular biota are a proper subset of those in richer biotas, and that an archipelago of such biotas, ranked by species richness, presents a nested series. The pattern characterizes the distributions of mammals in three different archipelagos, and it appears more strongly developed among faunas in the process of, relaxation (landbridge islands) than in those derived by overwater colonization (oceanic islands). The generality of the nested subset pattern and factors that may produce it are evaluated using distributions of land birds in the New Zealand region. Monte Carlo simulations show that species composition of these insular avifaunas is highly nonrandom, exhibiting significantly nested structure. However, avifaunas on nine oceanic islands lack the structure typical of all islands together or of the 22 landbridge islands. Thus, distinctive patterns of species composition, as well as species number, may distinguish landbridge and oceanic islands.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1987

References

  • Distributions of New Zealand birds on real and virtual islands
    Diamond, J. M.

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