The potential contribution of vegetation ecology to biodiversity research

The potential contribution of vegetation ecology to biodiversity research The contribution of vegetation ecology to the study of biodiversity depends on better communication between the different research paradigms in ecology. Recent developments in vegetation theory and associated statistical modelling techniques are reviewed for their relevance to biodiversity. Species composition and collective properties such as species richness vary as a continuum in a multi‐dimensional environmental space; a concept which needs to be incorporated into biodiversity studies. Different kinds of environmental gradients can be recognised and species responses to them vary. Species response curves of eucalypts to an environmental gradient of mean annual temperature have been shown to exhibit a particular pattern of skewed response curves. Generalised linear modelling (GLM) and generalised additive modelling (GAM) techniques are important tools for biodiversity studies. They have successfully distinguished the contribution of environmental (climatic) and spatial (history and species dispersal ability) variables in determining forest tree composition in New Zealand. Species richness studies are examined at global, regional and local scales. At all scales, direct and resource environmental gradients need to be incorporated into the analysis rather than indirect gradients e.g. latitude which have no direct physiological influence on biota. Evidence indicates that species richness at the regional scale is sensitive to environment, confounding current studies on local/regional species richness relationships. Plant community experiments require designs based on environmental gradients rather than dependent biological properties such as productivity or species richness to avoid confounding the biotic components. Neglect of climatic and other environmental gradients and the concentration on the collective properties of species assemblages has limited recent biodiversity studies. Conservation evaluation could benefit from greater use of the continuum concepts and statistical modelling techniques of vegetation ecology. The future development of ecology will depend on testing the different assumptions of competing research paradigms and a more inclusive synthesis of ecological theory. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecography Wiley

The potential contribution of vegetation ecology to biodiversity research

Ecography, Volume 22 (5) – Dec 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-potential-contribution-of-vegetation-ecology-to-biodiversity-acdPOh3qoY
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1999 Ecography
ISSN
0906-7590
eISSN
1600-0587
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0587.1999.tb01276.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The contribution of vegetation ecology to the study of biodiversity depends on better communication between the different research paradigms in ecology. Recent developments in vegetation theory and associated statistical modelling techniques are reviewed for their relevance to biodiversity. Species composition and collective properties such as species richness vary as a continuum in a multi‐dimensional environmental space; a concept which needs to be incorporated into biodiversity studies. Different kinds of environmental gradients can be recognised and species responses to them vary. Species response curves of eucalypts to an environmental gradient of mean annual temperature have been shown to exhibit a particular pattern of skewed response curves. Generalised linear modelling (GLM) and generalised additive modelling (GAM) techniques are important tools for biodiversity studies. They have successfully distinguished the contribution of environmental (climatic) and spatial (history and species dispersal ability) variables in determining forest tree composition in New Zealand. Species richness studies are examined at global, regional and local scales. At all scales, direct and resource environmental gradients need to be incorporated into the analysis rather than indirect gradients e.g. latitude which have no direct physiological influence on biota. Evidence indicates that species richness at the regional scale is sensitive to environment, confounding current studies on local/regional species richness relationships. Plant community experiments require designs based on environmental gradients rather than dependent biological properties such as productivity or species richness to avoid confounding the biotic components. Neglect of climatic and other environmental gradients and the concentration on the collective properties of species assemblages has limited recent biodiversity studies. Conservation evaluation could benefit from greater use of the continuum concepts and statistical modelling techniques of vegetation ecology. The future development of ecology will depend on testing the different assumptions of competing research paradigms and a more inclusive synthesis of ecological theory.

Journal

EcographyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1999

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off