The pharmacological characterization of 5‐HT 3 receptors in three isolated preparations derived from guinea‐pig tissues

The pharmacological characterization of 5‐HT 3 receptors in three isolated preparations derived... 1 The pharmacological characterization of the 5‐HT3 receptors in guinea‐pig isolated tissues is described. The tissues used were ileum (longitudinal muscle‐myenteric plexus), colon and vagus nerve. The guinea‐pig isolated colon is a novel preparation. 2 In the guinea‐pig isolated ileum, 5‐hydroxytryptamine (5‐HT, 1 × 10−8−3 × 10−5 m) and the selective 5‐HT3 receptor agonist 2‐methyl‐5‐HT (3 × 10−7−1 × 10−4 m) caused concentration‐related contractions. The 5‐HT concentration‐response curve was biphasic whilst the 2‐methyl‐5‐HT curve was monophasic. The EC50 value for the low potency portion of the 5‐HT curve was 4.1 × 10−6 m. The EC50 for 2‐methyl‐5‐HT was 1.23 × 10−5 m. Selective 5‐HT3 receptor antagonists caused rightward shifts of the 2‐methyl‐5‐HT curve and the lower potency portion of the 5‐HT curve. Neither ketanserin (1 × 10−6 m) nor methysergide (1 × 10−5 m) antagonized the responses to 5‐HT or 2‐methyl‐5‐HT. 3 In the guinea‐pig isolated colon, 5‐HT (3 × 10−7−3 × 10−5 m; EC50 2.4 × 10−6 m) caused contractions which were mimicked by 2‐methyl‐5‐HT (1 × 10−6−1 × 10−4 m; EC50 7.2 × 10−6 m). Selective 5‐HT3 receptor antagonists caused rightward displacements of the 5‐HT concentration‐response curves. Neither ketanserin (1 × 10−6 m) nor methysergide (1 × 10−5 m) had any effect on responses to 5‐HT or 2‐methyl‐5‐HT. 4 In the guinea‐pig isolated vagus nerve, 5‐HT (1 × 10−6−3 × 10−4 m) and 2‐methyl‐5‐HT (1 × 10−5−1 × 10−3 m; EC50 7.6 × 10−5 m) caused depolarizations; at higher concentrations there were afterhyperpolarizations. The maximum response to 2‐methyl‐5‐HT was less than half that to 5‐HT. Selective 5‐HT3 receptor antagonists caused rightward displacements of the 5‐HT concentration‐response curves. Antagonists at other 5‐HT receptors (ketanserin, 1 × 10−5 m and methysergide, 1 × 10−6 m) had no effect. 5 The estimated affinity values of 5‐HT3 receptor antagonists correlated well between the three models. Phenylbiguanide was inactive as an agonist or antagonist (up to 1 × 10−4 m) in each preparation. 6 Comparisons with antagonist affinity values obtained in the rat isolated vagus nerve revealed marked differences. Antagonists were generally more potent on the rat isolated vagus nerve, although the differences varied considerably between antagonists. 7 The results are discussed in terms of species‐related receptor differences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Pharmacology Wiley

The pharmacological characterization of 5‐HT 3 receptors in three isolated preparations derived from guinea‐pig tissues

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1990 British Pharmacological Society
ISSN
0007-1188
eISSN
1476-5381
DOI
10.1111/j.1476-5381.1990.tb14126.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 The pharmacological characterization of the 5‐HT3 receptors in guinea‐pig isolated tissues is described. The tissues used were ileum (longitudinal muscle‐myenteric plexus), colon and vagus nerve. The guinea‐pig isolated colon is a novel preparation. 2 In the guinea‐pig isolated ileum, 5‐hydroxytryptamine (5‐HT, 1 × 10−8−3 × 10−5 m) and the selective 5‐HT3 receptor agonist 2‐methyl‐5‐HT (3 × 10−7−1 × 10−4 m) caused concentration‐related contractions. The 5‐HT concentration‐response curve was biphasic whilst the 2‐methyl‐5‐HT curve was monophasic. The EC50 value for the low potency portion of the 5‐HT curve was 4.1 × 10−6 m. The EC50 for 2‐methyl‐5‐HT was 1.23 × 10−5 m. Selective 5‐HT3 receptor antagonists caused rightward shifts of the 2‐methyl‐5‐HT curve and the lower potency portion of the 5‐HT curve. Neither ketanserin (1 × 10−6 m) nor methysergide (1 × 10−5 m) antagonized the responses to 5‐HT or 2‐methyl‐5‐HT. 3 In the guinea‐pig isolated colon, 5‐HT (3 × 10−7−3 × 10−5 m; EC50 2.4 × 10−6 m) caused contractions which were mimicked by 2‐methyl‐5‐HT (1 × 10−6−1 × 10−4 m; EC50 7.2 × 10−6 m). Selective 5‐HT3 receptor antagonists caused rightward displacements of the 5‐HT concentration‐response curves. Neither ketanserin (1 × 10−6 m) nor methysergide (1 × 10−5 m) had any effect on responses to 5‐HT or 2‐methyl‐5‐HT. 4 In the guinea‐pig isolated vagus nerve, 5‐HT (1 × 10−6−3 × 10−4 m) and 2‐methyl‐5‐HT (1 × 10−5−1 × 10−3 m; EC50 7.6 × 10−5 m) caused depolarizations; at higher concentrations there were afterhyperpolarizations. The maximum response to 2‐methyl‐5‐HT was less than half that to 5‐HT. Selective 5‐HT3 receptor antagonists caused rightward displacements of the 5‐HT concentration‐response curves. Antagonists at other 5‐HT receptors (ketanserin, 1 × 10−5 m and methysergide, 1 × 10−6 m) had no effect. 5 The estimated affinity values of 5‐HT3 receptor antagonists correlated well between the three models. Phenylbiguanide was inactive as an agonist or antagonist (up to 1 × 10−4 m) in each preparation. 6 Comparisons with antagonist affinity values obtained in the rat isolated vagus nerve revealed marked differences. Antagonists were generally more potent on the rat isolated vagus nerve, although the differences varied considerably between antagonists. 7 The results are discussed in terms of species‐related receptor differences.

Journal

British Journal of PharmacologyWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1990

References

  • ( 3 H) zacopride: a ligand for the identification of 5‐HT 3 recognition sites
    BARNES, BARNES; COSTALL, COSTALL; NAYLOR, NAYLOR
  • Pharmacological properties of GR38032F, a novel antagonist at 5‐HT 3 receptors
    BUTLER, BUTLER; HILL, HILL; IRELAND, IRELAND; JORDAN, JORDAN; TYERS, TYERS
  • 5‐Hydroxytryptamine receptors on visceral primary afferent neurones on rabbit nodose ganglia
    HIGASHI, HIGASHI; NISHI, NISHI

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