The perils of single gene trees — mitochondrial versus single‐copy nuclear DNA variation in white‐eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae)

The perils of single gene trees — mitochondrial versus single‐copy nuclear DNA variation in... Phylogenetic relationships among animal populations and species commonly have been inferred from patterns of variation observed within a single gene system, most often the mitochondrial genome. Analysis of restriction site variation in the mitochondrial DNA of two species of white‐eye (Zosterops lateralis and Z. lutea) in Australia produced a single gene tree that does not accurately represent the organismal tree. In contrast, patterns of variation at two anonymous, single‐copy nuclear DNA loci revealed a phylogeography consistent with traditional classification of the species. Discordance between mitochondrial DNA and single‐copy nuclear DNA variation is probably the result of past hybridization between Z. lateralis and Z. lutea, evidence of which has been lost from the nuclear genome by recombination. This study provides a clear empirical demonstration that single gene genealogies cannot be assumed to accurately represent the true phylogenies, and emphasizes the need for composite genetic analyses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Ecology Wiley

The perils of single gene trees — mitochondrial versus single‐copy nuclear DNA variation in white‐eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae)

Molecular Ecology, Volume 2 (4) – Aug 1, 1993

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-perils-of-single-gene-trees-mitochondrial-versus-single-copy-S8R9E9WHsV
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1993 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0962-1083
eISSN
1365-294X
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-294X.1993.tb00011.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Phylogenetic relationships among animal populations and species commonly have been inferred from patterns of variation observed within a single gene system, most often the mitochondrial genome. Analysis of restriction site variation in the mitochondrial DNA of two species of white‐eye (Zosterops lateralis and Z. lutea) in Australia produced a single gene tree that does not accurately represent the organismal tree. In contrast, patterns of variation at two anonymous, single‐copy nuclear DNA loci revealed a phylogeography consistent with traditional classification of the species. Discordance between mitochondrial DNA and single‐copy nuclear DNA variation is probably the result of past hybridization between Z. lateralis and Z. lutea, evidence of which has been lost from the nuclear genome by recombination. This study provides a clear empirical demonstration that single gene genealogies cannot be assumed to accurately represent the true phylogenies, and emphasizes the need for composite genetic analyses.

Journal

Molecular EcologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1993

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

  • Intraspecific phylogeography: the mitochondrial DNA bridge between population genetics and systematics
    Avise, JC; Arnold, J.; Ball, RM
  • An approach to population and evolutionary genetic theory for genes in mitochondria and chloroplasts, and some results
    Birky, CW; Maruyama, T.; Fuerst, P.
  • Realized reproductive success of polygynous red‐winged blackbirds revealed by DNA markers
    Gibbs, HL; Weatherhead, PJ; Boag, PT; White, BN; Tabak, LM; Hoysak, DJ
  • Phylogeographic patterns in mitochondrial DNA of the desert tortoise (Xerobates agassizi), and evolutionary relationships among the North American gopher tortoises
    Lamb, T.; Avise, JC; Gibbons, JW
  • DNA marker analysis detects multiple maternity and paternity in single broods of the lesser snow goose
    Quinn, TW; Quinn, JS; Cooke, F.; White, BN

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off