The Origin and Mechanism of the Allograft Reaction

The Origin and Mechanism of the Allograft Reaction INTRODUCTION Investigations by Gorer, and later by Medawar and his colleagues, demonstrated the inimtmological nature of the allograft response (Medawar 1954). However, the violence of the reaction seen when tissues were exchanged between animals differing at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the genome was somewhat surprising, and gave rise to questions concerning the evolutionary origin of this response (Thomas 1959). In recent years attention has again been focused on the MHC of spedes with the accumulation of evidence that immune response (Ir) genes, genes that play a role in T-B cell collaboration, and genes that influence the specificity of cytotoxic T cells are also closely associated with the MHC of species (see Cunningham & Lafferty 1977). This association is seen in all species so far studied and therefore is unlikely to be a fortuitous relationship. Thus any attempt to answer the basic question concerning the origin of the allograft response must also consider why the regulation of immunoiogicai function (T cell function) is also controlled by genetic factors associated with the MHC. Thomas' explanation of the allograft response was that this immune function evolved to recognize tumor antigens expressed by transformed cells that posed a threat to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Immunological Reviews Wiley

The Origin and Mechanism of the Allograft Reaction

Immunological Reviews, Volume 35 (1) – Jun 1, 1977

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0105-2896
eISSN
1600-065X
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-065X.1977.tb00241.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Investigations by Gorer, and later by Medawar and his colleagues, demonstrated the inimtmological nature of the allograft response (Medawar 1954). However, the violence of the reaction seen when tissues were exchanged between animals differing at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the genome was somewhat surprising, and gave rise to questions concerning the evolutionary origin of this response (Thomas 1959). In recent years attention has again been focused on the MHC of spedes with the accumulation of evidence that immune response (Ir) genes, genes that play a role in T-B cell collaboration, and genes that influence the specificity of cytotoxic T cells are also closely associated with the MHC of species (see Cunningham & Lafferty 1977). This association is seen in all species so far studied and therefore is unlikely to be a fortuitous relationship. Thus any attempt to answer the basic question concerning the origin of the allograft response must also consider why the regulation of immunoiogicai function (T cell function) is also controlled by genetic factors associated with the MHC. Thomas' explanation of the allograft response was that this immune function evolved to recognize tumor antigens expressed by transformed cells that posed a threat to

Journal

Immunological ReviewsWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1977

References

  • Functional subclasses of T lymphocytes bearing different Ly antigens. I. The generation of functionally distinct T cell subclasses is a differentiate process independent of antigen
    Cantor, Cantor; Boyse, Boyse
  • A simple, conservative explanation for the H‐2 restriction of interactions between lymphocytes
    Cunningham, Cunningham; Lafferty, Lafferty
  • A rapid method for the isolation of functional thymus‐derived murine lymphocytes
    Julius, Julius; Simpson, Simpson; Herzenberg, Herzenberg
  • Allogeneic interactions provide evidence for a novel class of immunological reactivity
    Lafferty, Lafferty; Walker, Walker; Scollay, Scollay; Killby, Killby
  • Possible evolution of acquired immunity from self‐recognition structures
    Makela, Makela; Koskimies, Koskimies; Karjalainen, Karjalainen
  • Cell‐mediated cell lysis in vitro : genetic control of killer production and target specificities in the mouse
    Nabholtz, Nabholtz; Vives, Vives; Young, Young; Meo, Meo; Miggiano, Miggiano; Rijnbeek, Rijnbeek; Shreffler, Shreffler
  • T cell proliferation in the mixed lymphocyte culture does not necessarily result in the generation of cytotoxic T effector cells
    Röliinghoff, Röliinghoff; Pfizenmeier, Pfizenmeier; Trostmann, Trostmann; Wagner, Wagner
  • Cell mediated immune response in vitro. IV. Metabolic studies on cellular immunogenicity
    Wagner, Wagner

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