The metaboreflex does not contribute to the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity to contracting muscle during static exercise in humans

The metaboreflex does not contribute to the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity to... IntroductionNeural mechanisms closely regulate cardiovascular changes during exercise, including the increases in cardiac output, blood pressure and the redistribution of blood flow to match the metabolic demands of skeletal muscle. Blood flow to skeletal muscle is controlled by the amount of sympathetic vasoconstrictor drive, and it has been shown that the peak reduction in muscle blood flow occurs five or six cardiac cycles after a burst of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to that muscle (Fairfax et al. ). During volitional exercise, MSNA is governed by the activation of a centrally mediated efferent pathway (central command), a reflex generated by peripheral stimulation of chemically (metaboreflex) or mechanically (mechanoreflex) sensitive group IV and III afferent nerve fibre endings within the contracting muscle, and resetting of the arterial baroreflex. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor drive could also be linked to muscle activity (Seals, ; Boulton et al. , ) because the perfusion demands of skeletal muscle and other organs can vary greatly and in proportion to the level of activity (Andersen & Saltin, ; Saunders et al. ; Reeder & Green, ). Active skeletal muscle has a tremendous capacity to vasodilate and thereby increase its blood flow, especially at the onset of contraction (Reeder & Green, ). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiology Wiley

The metaboreflex does not contribute to the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity to contracting muscle during static exercise in humans

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-metaboreflex-does-not-contribute-to-the-increase-in-muscle-g0NEr1M2gl
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Journal compilation © 2018 The Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3751
eISSN
1469-7793
D.O.I.
10.1113/JP275526
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionNeural mechanisms closely regulate cardiovascular changes during exercise, including the increases in cardiac output, blood pressure and the redistribution of blood flow to match the metabolic demands of skeletal muscle. Blood flow to skeletal muscle is controlled by the amount of sympathetic vasoconstrictor drive, and it has been shown that the peak reduction in muscle blood flow occurs five or six cardiac cycles after a burst of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to that muscle (Fairfax et al. ). During volitional exercise, MSNA is governed by the activation of a centrally mediated efferent pathway (central command), a reflex generated by peripheral stimulation of chemically (metaboreflex) or mechanically (mechanoreflex) sensitive group IV and III afferent nerve fibre endings within the contracting muscle, and resetting of the arterial baroreflex. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor drive could also be linked to muscle activity (Seals, ; Boulton et al. , ) because the perfusion demands of skeletal muscle and other organs can vary greatly and in proportion to the level of activity (Andersen & Saltin, ; Saunders et al. ; Reeder & Green, ). Active skeletal muscle has a tremendous capacity to vasodilate and thereby increase its blood flow, especially at the onset of contraction (Reeder & Green, ).

Journal

The Journal of PhysiologyWiley

Published: Jan 15, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off