The interactions between food components and human nutrition

The interactions between food components and human nutrition As announced in the January editorial of IJFST, a number of virtual issues have been planned in 2018 to celebrate recently published papers focussed on a key area of research. In January, we launched the virtual issue on ‘Recent advancements in Wine Science’ which featured an editor's selection of 10 of the most influential papers on wine science published in IJFST in the last two years. This virtual issue is still available on the journal's website.I would like to announce the second virtual issue of the year ‘Advancements in dietary interventions for nutritional disorders’. There can be little argument that the relationship between food and human health has featured very highly in the attention of both the consumer and the food industry in recent years. The manipulation of diabetes and obesity is one of the current challenges food researchers are engaged with, and this is demonstrated by articles investigating the potential beneficial effects of cocoa (Mellor & Naumovski, ), legumes (Reynolds et al., ), combinations of soy milk and probiotics together with prebiotics (Liu et al., ; Xie et al., ) and collagen from fish material (Zhang et al., ). The role of dietary fibres and plant bioactive ingredients has been recognised as vital components of a healthy diet as evidenced by the article by Grundy et al. () on the potential use of almonds in improving digestive health, as well as the manuscript illustrating the role of whole grains and resistant starch in terms of insulin control (Aggarwal et al., ). Part of these benefits may be due to the rich sources of antioxidant material in plant‐based foods (Su et al., ). This is especially true when considering the functional benefits of tea polyphenols (Zhao et al., ), and how these polyphenols may modulate intestinal microflora and hence obesity and diabetes (Guo et al., ). Good news for consumers who regularly drink green tea.The virtual issue is available from April 2018, and the articles will be free to read and download for a period of three months. I hope that you find this collection of papers interesting to read and lead you onto further research work conducted by the authors and their co‐workers.ReferencesAggarwal, D., Sabikhi, L., Lamba, H., Chaudhary, N. & Kapila, R. (2017). Whole grains and resistant starch rich, reduced‐calorie biscuit diet as a hypoglycaemic, hypolipidaemic and insulin stimulator in streptozotocin‐induced diabetic rats. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 118–126.Grundy, M.M.‐L., Lapsley, K. & Ellis, P.R. (2016). A review of the impact of processing on nutrient bioaccessibility and digestion of almonds. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51, 1937–1946.Guo, X., Cheng, M., Zhang, X., Cao, J., Wu, Z. & Weng, P. (2017). Green tea polyphenols reduce obesity in high‐fat diet‐induced mice by modulating intestinal microbiota composition. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 1723–1730.Liu, D.‐M., Guo, J., Zeng, X.‐A. et al. (2017). The probiotic role of Lactobacillus plantarum in reducing risks associated with cardiovascular disease. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 127–136.Mellor, D.D. & Naumovski, N. (2016). Effect of cocoa in diabetes: the potential of the pancreas and liver as key target organs, more than an antioxidant effect?. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51, 829–841.Reynolds, K., Wood, J., Wang, F., Zhou, Z., Blanchard, C. & Strappe, P. (2016). Extracts of common pulses demonstrate potent in vitro anti‐adipogenic properties. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51, 1327–1337.Su, D., Liu, H., Zeng, Q., Qi, X., Yao, X. & Zhang, J. (2017). Changes in the phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of citrus peels from different cultivars after in vitro digestion. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 2471–2478.Xie, C.‐L., Hwang, C.E., Oh, C.K. et al. (2017). Fermented soy‐powder milk with Lactobacillus plantarum P1201 protects against high‐fat diet‐induced obesity. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 1614–1622.Zhang, R., Chen, J., Jiang, X., Yin, L. & Zhang, X. (2016). Antioxidant and hypoglycaemic effects of tilapia skin collagen peptide in mice. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51, 2157–2163.Zhao, M., Li, D., Ye, J.‐H., Zheng, X.‐Q., Liang, Y.‐R. & Lu, J.‐L. (2017). Stop for tea? Enzyme inhibitors from tea – what good are they? International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 586–594. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Food Science & Technology Wiley

The interactions between food components and human nutrition

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
International Journal of Food Science and Technology © 2018 Institute of Food Science and Technology
ISSN
0950-5423
eISSN
1365-2621
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijfs.13764
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Abstract

As announced in the January editorial of IJFST, a number of virtual issues have been planned in 2018 to celebrate recently published papers focussed on a key area of research. In January, we launched the virtual issue on ‘Recent advancements in Wine Science’ which featured an editor's selection of 10 of the most influential papers on wine science published in IJFST in the last two years. This virtual issue is still available on the journal's website.I would like to announce the second virtual issue of the year ‘Advancements in dietary interventions for nutritional disorders’. There can be little argument that the relationship between food and human health has featured very highly in the attention of both the consumer and the food industry in recent years. The manipulation of diabetes and obesity is one of the current challenges food researchers are engaged with, and this is demonstrated by articles investigating the potential beneficial effects of cocoa (Mellor & Naumovski, ), legumes (Reynolds et al., ), combinations of soy milk and probiotics together with prebiotics (Liu et al., ; Xie et al., ) and collagen from fish material (Zhang et al., ). The role of dietary fibres and plant bioactive ingredients has been recognised as vital components of a healthy diet as evidenced by the article by Grundy et al. () on the potential use of almonds in improving digestive health, as well as the manuscript illustrating the role of whole grains and resistant starch in terms of insulin control (Aggarwal et al., ). Part of these benefits may be due to the rich sources of antioxidant material in plant‐based foods (Su et al., ). This is especially true when considering the functional benefits of tea polyphenols (Zhao et al., ), and how these polyphenols may modulate intestinal microflora and hence obesity and diabetes (Guo et al., ). Good news for consumers who regularly drink green tea.The virtual issue is available from April 2018, and the articles will be free to read and download for a period of three months. I hope that you find this collection of papers interesting to read and lead you onto further research work conducted by the authors and their co‐workers.ReferencesAggarwal, D., Sabikhi, L., Lamba, H., Chaudhary, N. & Kapila, R. (2017). Whole grains and resistant starch rich, reduced‐calorie biscuit diet as a hypoglycaemic, hypolipidaemic and insulin stimulator in streptozotocin‐induced diabetic rats. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 118–126.Grundy, M.M.‐L., Lapsley, K. & Ellis, P.R. (2016). A review of the impact of processing on nutrient bioaccessibility and digestion of almonds. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51, 1937–1946.Guo, X., Cheng, M., Zhang, X., Cao, J., Wu, Z. & Weng, P. (2017). Green tea polyphenols reduce obesity in high‐fat diet‐induced mice by modulating intestinal microbiota composition. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 1723–1730.Liu, D.‐M., Guo, J., Zeng, X.‐A. et al. (2017). The probiotic role of Lactobacillus plantarum in reducing risks associated with cardiovascular disease. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 127–136.Mellor, D.D. & Naumovski, N. (2016). Effect of cocoa in diabetes: the potential of the pancreas and liver as key target organs, more than an antioxidant effect?. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51, 829–841.Reynolds, K., Wood, J., Wang, F., Zhou, Z., Blanchard, C. & Strappe, P. (2016). Extracts of common pulses demonstrate potent in vitro anti‐adipogenic properties. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51, 1327–1337.Su, D., Liu, H., Zeng, Q., Qi, X., Yao, X. & Zhang, J. (2017). Changes in the phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of citrus peels from different cultivars after in vitro digestion. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 2471–2478.Xie, C.‐L., Hwang, C.E., Oh, C.K. et al. (2017). Fermented soy‐powder milk with Lactobacillus plantarum P1201 protects against high‐fat diet‐induced obesity. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 1614–1622.Zhang, R., Chen, J., Jiang, X., Yin, L. & Zhang, X. (2016). Antioxidant and hypoglycaemic effects of tilapia skin collagen peptide in mice. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 51, 2157–2163.Zhao, M., Li, D., Ye, J.‐H., Zheng, X.‐Q., Liang, Y.‐R. & Lu, J.‐L. (2017). Stop for tea? Enzyme inhibitors from tea – what good are they? International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 52, 586–594.

Journal

International Journal of Food Science & TechnologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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