The influence of age on wild rhesus macaques' affiliative social interactions

The influence of age on wild rhesus macaques' affiliative social interactions INTRODUCTIONSocieties are complex systems in which animals have to make a trade‐off in their time investment on different partners in order to optimize their fitness (Lehmann, Majolo, & McFarland, ; Massen et al., ; Rommeck, Capitanio, Strand, & McCowan, ; Silk, ). Moreover, the long‐life expectancy of many primates exposes them to continual changes in physical condition and environment throughout their lives, obliging animals to face various selective pressures at different life stages namely infancy, juvenility, and adulthood. To attain a better survival rate or higher reproductive efficiency, individuals may modulate patterns of social interaction according to their current needs and situation (Henzi, Lusseau, Weingrill, van Schaik, & Barrett, ; Silk, ; Silk et al., ).The small body size, low locomotivity, and limited experience of juveniles make them vulnerable and easy prey for predators. From this perspective, juveniles could benefit from staying at the center of the group to reduce the probability of being prey, thus increasing their chances of survival (Stanton & Mann, ). Some studies using the social network analysis method have shown that the high social activity of juveniles provides them with higher degrees and higher centralities than adults (Fedurek & Lehmann, ; Sosa, ). Such http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Primatology Wiley

The influence of age on wild rhesus macaques' affiliative social interactions

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0275-2565
eISSN
1098-2345
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajp.22733
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONSocieties are complex systems in which animals have to make a trade‐off in their time investment on different partners in order to optimize their fitness (Lehmann, Majolo, & McFarland, ; Massen et al., ; Rommeck, Capitanio, Strand, & McCowan, ; Silk, ). Moreover, the long‐life expectancy of many primates exposes them to continual changes in physical condition and environment throughout their lives, obliging animals to face various selective pressures at different life stages namely infancy, juvenility, and adulthood. To attain a better survival rate or higher reproductive efficiency, individuals may modulate patterns of social interaction according to their current needs and situation (Henzi, Lusseau, Weingrill, van Schaik, & Barrett, ; Silk, ; Silk et al., ).The small body size, low locomotivity, and limited experience of juveniles make them vulnerable and easy prey for predators. From this perspective, juveniles could benefit from staying at the center of the group to reduce the probability of being prey, thus increasing their chances of survival (Stanton & Mann, ). Some studies using the social network analysis method have shown that the high social activity of juveniles provides them with higher degrees and higher centralities than adults (Fedurek & Lehmann, ; Sosa, ). Such

Journal

American Journal of PrimatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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