The Importance of Graft Placement and Task Complexity for Transplant‐Induced Recovery of Simple and Complex Sensorimotor Deficits in Dopamine Denervated Rats

The Importance of Graft Placement and Task Complexity for Transplant‐Induced Recovery of Simple... The present study examined the role of graft placement and behavioural task complexity in determining the functional efficacy of intrastriatal grafts of dopamine‐rich fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) placed in the dopamine (DA) depleted striatum. The functional effects of two different striatal placements of VM grafts were evaluated using tests of drug‐induced motor asymmetry, simple sensorimolor orienting response, and a more complex sensorimotor integrative task (disengage behaviour), in which the rat has to perform the orienting response while in the act of eating. Rats with complete unilateral 6‐hydroxydopamine (6‐OHDA) lesions of the mesostriatal DA pathway, received either implants of dissociated fetal VM in the central or ventrolateral portions of the denervated striatum. Nongrafted lesioned rats served as controls. Nine weeks after grafting, the rats were tested on separate days for disengage behaviour, sensorimotor orientation, and amphetamine‐induced rotational behaviour. Consistent with previous findings, the two graft placements had differential effects on drug‐induced motor asymmetry and sensorimotor responses: the centrally placed VM grafts reversed amphetamine‐induced rotational asymmetry but had little effect on the sensorimotor deficit, whereas the ventrolaterally placed grafts reversed the sensorimotor orientation deficits without any effect on the drug‐induced rotation. In contrast, fetal VM grafts, regardless of their placement, did not ameliorate the observed deficits in disengage behaviour; that is the grafted rats that had recovered their sensorimotor response in the absence of food were unable to perform the same orienting response while eating. These results provide evidence that functional intrastriatal VM grafts which are capable of restoring sensorimotor responses or motor asymmetry fail to affect lesion‐induced deficits in a task that requires more complex sensorimotor integration. It is suggested that the degree of anatomical integration of the grafted DA neurons into the host circuitry will determine the efficacy of the grafts to influence more complex sensorimotor integrative deficits in the DA lesion model. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Neuroscience Wiley

The Importance of Graft Placement and Task Complexity for Transplant‐Induced Recovery of Simple and Complex Sensorimotor Deficits in Dopamine Denervated Rats

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-importance-of-graft-placement-and-task-complexity-for-transplant-fVPxr9EGaC
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0953-816X
eISSN
1460-9568
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1460-9568.1990.tb00400.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study examined the role of graft placement and behavioural task complexity in determining the functional efficacy of intrastriatal grafts of dopamine‐rich fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) placed in the dopamine (DA) depleted striatum. The functional effects of two different striatal placements of VM grafts were evaluated using tests of drug‐induced motor asymmetry, simple sensorimolor orienting response, and a more complex sensorimotor integrative task (disengage behaviour), in which the rat has to perform the orienting response while in the act of eating. Rats with complete unilateral 6‐hydroxydopamine (6‐OHDA) lesions of the mesostriatal DA pathway, received either implants of dissociated fetal VM in the central or ventrolateral portions of the denervated striatum. Nongrafted lesioned rats served as controls. Nine weeks after grafting, the rats were tested on separate days for disengage behaviour, sensorimotor orientation, and amphetamine‐induced rotational behaviour. Consistent with previous findings, the two graft placements had differential effects on drug‐induced motor asymmetry and sensorimotor responses: the centrally placed VM grafts reversed amphetamine‐induced rotational asymmetry but had little effect on the sensorimotor deficit, whereas the ventrolaterally placed grafts reversed the sensorimotor orientation deficits without any effect on the drug‐induced rotation. In contrast, fetal VM grafts, regardless of their placement, did not ameliorate the observed deficits in disengage behaviour; that is the grafted rats that had recovered their sensorimotor response in the absence of food were unable to perform the same orienting response while eating. These results provide evidence that functional intrastriatal VM grafts which are capable of restoring sensorimotor responses or motor asymmetry fail to affect lesion‐induced deficits in a task that requires more complex sensorimotor integration. It is suggested that the degree of anatomical integration of the grafted DA neurons into the host circuitry will determine the efficacy of the grafts to influence more complex sensorimotor integrative deficits in the DA lesion model.

Journal

European Journal of NeuroscienceWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1990

References

  • Human fetal dopamine neurons grafted in a rat model of Parkinson's disease: Ultrastructural evidence for synapse formation using tyrosine hydroxylase immunocytochemistry
    Clarke, Clarke; Brundin, Brundin; Strecker, Strecker; Nilsson, Nilsson; Bjorklund, Bjorklund; Lindvall, Lindvall
  • Graft‐derived recovery from 6‐OHDA lesions: specificity of ventral mesencephalic graft tissues
    Dunnett, Dunnett; Whishaw, Whishaw; Rogers, Rogers; Jones, Jones; Arbuthnott, Arbuthnott

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off