The importance of dispersal and recent speciation in the flora of New Zealand

The importance of dispersal and recent speciation in the flora of New Zealand Comments on M. Poole (1994) The New Zealand flora – entirely long‐distance dispersal? J. Biogeogr. 21 , 625–635 and letter from M. K. Macphail (1997) J. Biogeogr. 24 , 113–114. The origins of the New Zealand flora have been the subject of considerable debate, particularly amongst botanists discussing the relative importance of plant dispersal in the Southern Hemisphere. Wardle (1963, 1968, 1978) , although explaining some plant distributions by dispersal, has suggested that New Zealand's flora arose largely through diversification of taxa present on southern ocean lands following the break‐up of the Gondwanan supercontinent. In contrast, Raven (1973) has proposed a main route of dispersal from the Northern Hemisphere via Australia for the (sub)alpine flora of New Zealand. Pole (1994) and Macphail (1997 ) have also argued for the general importance of Australia as a source for the New Zealand flora. However, their view is more extreme. They assume that New Zealand was completely submerged during the Oligocene and that all extant plant lineages in New Zealand (both alpine and lowland) have arrived from Australia by long distance dispersal since the Miocene. Their conclusion follows from observations that in New Zealand there is a poor match between extant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Biogeography Wiley

The importance of dispersal and recent speciation in the flora of New Zealand

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-importance-of-dispersal-and-recent-speciation-in-the-flora-of-new-0VwDjZai7u
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0305-0270
eISSN
1365-2699
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2699.1999.00392.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Comments on M. Poole (1994) The New Zealand flora – entirely long‐distance dispersal? J. Biogeogr. 21 , 625–635 and letter from M. K. Macphail (1997) J. Biogeogr. 24 , 113–114. The origins of the New Zealand flora have been the subject of considerable debate, particularly amongst botanists discussing the relative importance of plant dispersal in the Southern Hemisphere. Wardle (1963, 1968, 1978) , although explaining some plant distributions by dispersal, has suggested that New Zealand's flora arose largely through diversification of taxa present on southern ocean lands following the break‐up of the Gondwanan supercontinent. In contrast, Raven (1973) has proposed a main route of dispersal from the Northern Hemisphere via Australia for the (sub)alpine flora of New Zealand. Pole (1994) and Macphail (1997 ) have also argued for the general importance of Australia as a source for the New Zealand flora. However, their view is more extreme. They assume that New Zealand was completely submerged during the Oligocene and that all extant plant lineages in New Zealand (both alpine and lowland) have arrived from Australia by long distance dispersal since the Miocene. Their conclusion follows from observations that in New Zealand there is a poor match between extant

Journal

Journal of BiogeographyWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1999

References

  • Nothofagus and Pacific biogeography
    Linder, Linder; Crisp, Crisp

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off