The importance of climate and soils for estimates of net primary production: a sensitivity analysis with the terrestrial ecosystem model

The importance of climate and soils for estimates of net primary production: a sensitivity... We used the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to investigate how alternative input data sets of climate (temperature/precipitation), solar radiation, and soil texture affect estimates of net primary productivity (NPP) for the conterminous United States. At the continental resolution, the climates of Cramer and Leemans (C&L) and of the Vegetation/ Ecosystem Modelling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) represent cooler and drier conditions for the United States in comparison to the Legates and Willmott (L&W) climate, and cause 5.2% and 2.3% lower estimates of NPP. Solar radiation derived from C&L and given in VEMAP is 32% and 60% higher than the solar radiation data derived from Hahn cloudiness. These differences cause ∼ 8% and 10% lower NPP because of radiation‐induced water stress. In comparison to the FAO/CSRC soil texture, which represents most biomes with loam soils, the soil textures are finer (more silt and clay) in the Zobler and VEMAP data sets. The use of VEMAP soil textures instead of FAO/CSRC soil textures causes ∼ 3% higher NPP because enhanced volumetric soil moisture causes higher rates of nitrogen cycling, but use of the Zobler soil textures has little effect. In general, NPP estimates of TEM are more sensitive to alternative data sets at the biome and grid cell resolutions than at the continental resolution. At all spatial resolutions, the sensitivity of NPP estimates represents the impact of uncertainty among the alternative data sets we used in this study. The reduction of uncertainty in input data sets is required to improve the spatial resolution of NPP estimates by process‐based ecosystem models, and is especially important for improving assessments of the regional impacts of global change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Change Biology Wiley

The importance of climate and soils for estimates of net primary production: a sensitivity analysis with the terrestrial ecosystem model

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-importance-of-climate-and-soils-for-estimates-of-net-primary-RjMQn4I7Jx
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1354-1013
eISSN
1365-2486
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2486.1996.tb00045.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We used the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to investigate how alternative input data sets of climate (temperature/precipitation), solar radiation, and soil texture affect estimates of net primary productivity (NPP) for the conterminous United States. At the continental resolution, the climates of Cramer and Leemans (C&L) and of the Vegetation/ Ecosystem Modelling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) represent cooler and drier conditions for the United States in comparison to the Legates and Willmott (L&W) climate, and cause 5.2% and 2.3% lower estimates of NPP. Solar radiation derived from C&L and given in VEMAP is 32% and 60% higher than the solar radiation data derived from Hahn cloudiness. These differences cause ∼ 8% and 10% lower NPP because of radiation‐induced water stress. In comparison to the FAO/CSRC soil texture, which represents most biomes with loam soils, the soil textures are finer (more silt and clay) in the Zobler and VEMAP data sets. The use of VEMAP soil textures instead of FAO/CSRC soil textures causes ∼ 3% higher NPP because enhanced volumetric soil moisture causes higher rates of nitrogen cycling, but use of the Zobler soil textures has little effect. In general, NPP estimates of TEM are more sensitive to alternative data sets at the biome and grid cell resolutions than at the continental resolution. At all spatial resolutions, the sensitivity of NPP estimates represents the impact of uncertainty among the alternative data sets we used in this study. The reduction of uncertainty in input data sets is required to improve the spatial resolution of NPP estimates by process‐based ecosystem models, and is especially important for improving assessments of the regional impacts of global change.

Journal

Global Change BiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1996

References

  • Global climate change and US agriculture
    Adams, Adams; Rosenzweig, Rosenzweig; Peart, Peart
  • Mean seasonal and spatial variability in gauge‐corrected, global precipitation
    Legates, Legates; Willmott, Willmott
  • Interactions between carbon and nitrogen dynamics in estimating net primary productivity for potential vegetation in North America
    McGuire, McGuire; Melillo, Melillo; Joyce, Joyce; Kicklighter, Kicklighter; Grace, Grace; Moore, Moore; Vörösmarty, Vörösmarty
  • Primary production of the central grasslands region of the United States
    Sala, Sala; Parton, Parton; Joyce, Joyce; Lauenroth, Lauenroth
  • Climate, edaphic and biotic controls over storage and turnover of carbon in soils
    Schimel, Schimel; Braswell, Braswell; Holland, Holland
  • Continental scale model of water balance and fluvial transport: an application to south America
    Vörösmarty, Vörösmarty; Moore, Moore; Grace, Grace

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off