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The impact of videoconference technology, interview structure, and interviewer gender on interviewer evaluations in the employment interview: A field experiment

The impact of videoconference technology, interview structure, and interviewer gender on... Despite the growing use of communication technologies, such as videoconferencing, in recruiting and selection, there is little research examining whether these technologies influence interviewers' perceptions of candidates. The present field experiment analysed evaluations of 92 real job applicants who were randomly assigned either to be interviewed face‐to‐face (FTF) (N = 48) or using a desktop videoconference system (N = 44). The results show a bias in favour of the videoconference applicants relative to FTF applicants, F(1,91) = 7.35, p = .01. A significant interaction of interview structure and interviewer gender was also found, F(1,91) = 3.70, p < .05, with female interviewers using an unstructured interview rating applicants significantly higher than males or females using a structured interview. Interview structure did not significantly moderate the influence of interview medium on interviewers' evaluations of applicants. These findings highlight the need to be aware of potential biases resulting from the use of communication technologies in the hiring process. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology Wiley

The impact of videoconference technology, interview structure, and interviewer gender on interviewer evaluations in the employment interview: A field experiment

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2001 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0963-1798
eISSN
2044-8325
DOI
10.1348/096317901167361
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite the growing use of communication technologies, such as videoconferencing, in recruiting and selection, there is little research examining whether these technologies influence interviewers' perceptions of candidates. The present field experiment analysed evaluations of 92 real job applicants who were randomly assigned either to be interviewed face‐to‐face (FTF) (N = 48) or using a desktop videoconference system (N = 44). The results show a bias in favour of the videoconference applicants relative to FTF applicants, F(1,91) = 7.35, p = .01. A significant interaction of interview structure and interviewer gender was also found, F(1,91) = 3.70, p < .05, with female interviewers using an unstructured interview rating applicants significantly higher than males or females using a structured interview. Interview structure did not significantly moderate the influence of interview medium on interviewers' evaluations of applicants. These findings highlight the need to be aware of potential biases resulting from the use of communication technologies in the hiring process.

Journal

Journal of Occupational and Organizational PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2001

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