The impact of bisphenol S on bovine granulosa and theca cells

The impact of bisphenol S on bovine granulosa and theca cells Bisphenol S (BPS) is an endocrine‐disrupting chemical with multiple potential mechanisms of action, including as an oestrogen receptor agonist. BPS is increasingly used in plastics and thermal receipts as a substitute for bisphenol A, which has been phased out due to concerns about human health implications. The ability of BPS to alter female reproductive function in mammals has not been widely studied, despite the importance of normal hormone signalling for female reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate how BPS (in a wide range of doses, including very low doses) affects granulosa cell and theca cell steroid hormone production and cell viability in the bovine. Granulosa cell oestradiol production was stimulated when cells were exposed to 100 μM BPS under basal conditions, but there was no effect of BPS when cells were stimulated with follicle‐stimulating hormone (FSH). Additionally, there was no effect of BPS on granulosa cell progesterone production or cell viability under basal or FSH‐stimulated conditions. BPS did not affect theca cell androstenedione or progesterone production, or theca cell viability under basal or luteinizing hormone‐stimulated conditions. This study suggests for the first time that BPS may alter oestradiol production by bovine granulosa cells, albeit at a concentration that is unlikely to be physiologically relevant. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of BPS on the bovine oocyte and on other functions of follicular cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reproduction in Domestic Animals Wiley

The impact of bisphenol S on bovine granulosa and theca cells

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH
ISSN
0936-6768
eISSN
1439-0531
D.O.I.
10.1111/rda.13130
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bisphenol S (BPS) is an endocrine‐disrupting chemical with multiple potential mechanisms of action, including as an oestrogen receptor agonist. BPS is increasingly used in plastics and thermal receipts as a substitute for bisphenol A, which has been phased out due to concerns about human health implications. The ability of BPS to alter female reproductive function in mammals has not been widely studied, despite the importance of normal hormone signalling for female reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate how BPS (in a wide range of doses, including very low doses) affects granulosa cell and theca cell steroid hormone production and cell viability in the bovine. Granulosa cell oestradiol production was stimulated when cells were exposed to 100 μM BPS under basal conditions, but there was no effect of BPS when cells were stimulated with follicle‐stimulating hormone (FSH). Additionally, there was no effect of BPS on granulosa cell progesterone production or cell viability under basal or FSH‐stimulated conditions. BPS did not affect theca cell androstenedione or progesterone production, or theca cell viability under basal or luteinizing hormone‐stimulated conditions. This study suggests for the first time that BPS may alter oestradiol production by bovine granulosa cells, albeit at a concentration that is unlikely to be physiologically relevant. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of BPS on the bovine oocyte and on other functions of follicular cells.

Journal

Reproduction in Domestic AnimalsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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