The Human Dimension of Coral Reef Marine Protected Areas: Recent Social Science Research and Its Policy Implications

The Human Dimension of Coral Reef Marine Protected Areas: Recent Social Science Research and Its... Introduction Coral reefs provide ecosystem goods and services to millions of people around the world ( Cesar et al. 1997 ; Costanza et al. 1997 ). The long‐term sustainability of these ecosystem benefits is threatened, however, by direct overexploitation of coral reef resources, destructive fishing practices, air and water pollution, and climate change ( Wilkinson 2000 ). Traditional efforts to manage coral reefs—species by species, sector by sector—have proven insufficient to ensure resource sustainability or to protect biodiversity against these threats, spurring calls for an ecosystem‐oriented approach ( Botsford et al. 1997 ; Cicin‐Sain & Knecht 1998 ; National Research Council 1999, 2001 ). Central to this ecosystem approach to coral reef management are marine protected areas ( MPAs ), a family of spatially explicit marine management systems that includes underwater parks, fishery reserves, and wildlife sanctuaries ( National Research Council 1999, 2001 ). Coral reef MPAs have yet to realize their full potential. Although the number of coral reef MPAs has grown rapidly in recent years, their performance remains highly variable ( Kelleher et al. 1995 ; Halpern in press; M. G. Pajaro, C. M. Nozawa, M. N. Lavides, and S. Gutierrez. 2000. Status of marine protected http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

The Human Dimension of Coral Reef Marine Protected Areas: Recent Social Science Research and Its Policy Implications

Conservation Biology, Volume 17 (2) – Apr 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-human-dimension-of-coral-reef-marine-protected-areas-recent-social-btt0q309Ma
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1046/j.1523-1739.2003.01454.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Coral reefs provide ecosystem goods and services to millions of people around the world ( Cesar et al. 1997 ; Costanza et al. 1997 ). The long‐term sustainability of these ecosystem benefits is threatened, however, by direct overexploitation of coral reef resources, destructive fishing practices, air and water pollution, and climate change ( Wilkinson 2000 ). Traditional efforts to manage coral reefs—species by species, sector by sector—have proven insufficient to ensure resource sustainability or to protect biodiversity against these threats, spurring calls for an ecosystem‐oriented approach ( Botsford et al. 1997 ; Cicin‐Sain & Knecht 1998 ; National Research Council 1999, 2001 ). Central to this ecosystem approach to coral reef management are marine protected areas ( MPAs ), a family of spatially explicit marine management systems that includes underwater parks, fishery reserves, and wildlife sanctuaries ( National Research Council 1999, 2001 ). Coral reef MPAs have yet to realize their full potential. Although the number of coral reef MPAs has grown rapidly in recent years, their performance remains highly variable ( Kelleher et al. 1995 ; Halpern in press; M. G. Pajaro, C. M. Nozawa, M. N. Lavides, and S. Gutierrez. 2000. Status of marine protected

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2003

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off