The horse is ready: We are building the cart

The horse is ready: We are building the cart The pursuit of accurate prediction models for suicidal behavior has proved to be daunting. As noted by Saffer and Klonsky () in their citation of recent meta‐analyses, 50 years of empirical research on psychopathological risk factors for suicidal thinking and suicidal behavior has given us a better sense of the origins of suicidal thinking, but not of the ultimate precipitants of actual suicidal acts. In this context, neurocognitive factors have emerged as potential contributors to these risk models, given that they appear to assess something other than standard psychopathological severity. Saffer and Klonsky review the potential contribution of the limited literature that currently exists on differences between suicide attempters and suicidal ideators and draw some tentative conclusions, but with the caveat that the data are at present sparse.In part, this is due to the manner in which this literature has developed. Only 14 of the 159 articles found by Saffer and Klonsky () that used neurocognitive measures to assess suicide attempters involved a comparison of attempters versus ideators. The vast majority of these articles compared suicide attempters to either psychiatric comparison subjects or to healthy volunteers, which—practically—appears to have been a necessary first step in the evolution of this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice Wiley

The horse is ready: We are building the cart

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Society of Clinical Psychology
ISSN
0969-5893
eISSN
1468-2850
D.O.I.
10.1111/cpsp.12228
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The pursuit of accurate prediction models for suicidal behavior has proved to be daunting. As noted by Saffer and Klonsky () in their citation of recent meta‐analyses, 50 years of empirical research on psychopathological risk factors for suicidal thinking and suicidal behavior has given us a better sense of the origins of suicidal thinking, but not of the ultimate precipitants of actual suicidal acts. In this context, neurocognitive factors have emerged as potential contributors to these risk models, given that they appear to assess something other than standard psychopathological severity. Saffer and Klonsky review the potential contribution of the limited literature that currently exists on differences between suicide attempters and suicidal ideators and draw some tentative conclusions, but with the caveat that the data are at present sparse.In part, this is due to the manner in which this literature has developed. Only 14 of the 159 articles found by Saffer and Klonsky () that used neurocognitive measures to assess suicide attempters involved a comparison of attempters versus ideators. The vast majority of these articles compared suicide attempters to either psychiatric comparison subjects or to healthy volunteers, which—practically—appears to have been a necessary first step in the evolution of this

Journal

Clinical Psychology: Science and PracticeWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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