The Grassy Box Woodlands Conservation Management Network: Picking up the pieces in fragmented woodlands

The Grassy Box Woodlands Conservation Management Network: Picking up the pieces in fragmented... Fragmentation not only separates biological communities but also land managers. Might a new model ‐ Conservation Management Networks ‐ be part of the management solution? A ustralia’s conservation estate has traditionally been seen as a collection of National Parks and Nature Reserves. While these are central to the conservation of many ecological communities, many critically important natural areas remain, and are always likely to remain, outside such traditional reserves. This is particularly true for fragmented ecological communities that were once extensive but are now represented by many small, widely scattered remnants in varying states of ecological health. Often there is no available small subset of large remnants that can adequately represent such ecological communities in a National Park system; instead, a large set of mostly small remnants is needed to represent the original ecosystem in the conservation estate. A key to adequate conservation of fragmented ecological communities is the coordinated protection and management of sets of remnants. As we have discussed in earlier papers ( Thiele & Prober 1999, 2000 ), permanent protection and ongoing management support are important in this approach. Furthermore, acquisition and management of remnants by a centralized agency can be unnecessary or even undesirable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Management & Restoration Wiley

The Grassy Box Woodlands Conservation Management Network: Picking up the pieces in fragmented woodlands

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1442-7001
eISSN
1442-8903
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1442-8903.2001.00082.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fragmentation not only separates biological communities but also land managers. Might a new model ‐ Conservation Management Networks ‐ be part of the management solution? A ustralia’s conservation estate has traditionally been seen as a collection of National Parks and Nature Reserves. While these are central to the conservation of many ecological communities, many critically important natural areas remain, and are always likely to remain, outside such traditional reserves. This is particularly true for fragmented ecological communities that were once extensive but are now represented by many small, widely scattered remnants in varying states of ecological health. Often there is no available small subset of large remnants that can adequately represent such ecological communities in a National Park system; instead, a large set of mostly small remnants is needed to represent the original ecosystem in the conservation estate. A key to adequate conservation of fragmented ecological communities is the coordinated protection and management of sets of remnants. As we have discussed in earlier papers ( Thiele & Prober 1999, 2000 ), permanent protection and ongoing management support are important in this approach. Furthermore, acquisition and management of remnants by a centralized agency can be unnecessary or even undesirable.

Journal

Ecological Management & RestorationWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2001

References

  • Linking ecological scales and institutional frameworks for landscape rehabilitation.
    Briggs, Briggs

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