The Global 200: A Representation Approach to Conserving the Earth’s Most Biologically Valuable Ecoregions

The Global 200: A Representation Approach to Conserving the Earth’s Most Biologically Valuable... Conservation Biology, Pages 502–515 Volume 12, No. 3, June 1998 The representation approach, accepted by a growing number of conservationists, is soundly based in conservation biology. It integrates the goal of maintaining species diversity—the traditional focus of biodiversity conservation—with another level of conservation action, the preservation of distinct ecosystems and ecological processes. Although more than half of all species are likely to occur in the world’s tropical moist forests, the other 50% of all species are found elsewhere. To conserve that half, a full representation of the world’s diverse ecosystems must be the goal. Tundra, tropical lakes, mangroves, and temperate broadleaf forests are all unique expressions of biodiversity. Although they may not support the rich communities seen in tropical rainforests or coral reefs, they contain species assemblages adapted to distinct environmental conditions and reflect different evolutionary histories. To lose examples of these assemblages, and the ecological processes and evolutionary phenomena they contain, would represent an enormous loss of biodiversity. Although conservation action typically takes place at the country level, patterns of biodiversity and ecological processes (e.g., migration) do not conform to political boundaries. Thus, we used the ecoregion as the unit of analysis in creating the Global 200. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

The Global 200: A Representation Approach to Conserving the Earth’s Most Biologically Valuable Ecoregions

Conservation Biology, Volume 12 (3) – Jun 17, 1998

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Society for Conservation Biology
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1998.012003502.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Conservation Biology, Pages 502–515 Volume 12, No. 3, June 1998 The representation approach, accepted by a growing number of conservationists, is soundly based in conservation biology. It integrates the goal of maintaining species diversity—the traditional focus of biodiversity conservation—with another level of conservation action, the preservation of distinct ecosystems and ecological processes. Although more than half of all species are likely to occur in the world’s tropical moist forests, the other 50% of all species are found elsewhere. To conserve that half, a full representation of the world’s diverse ecosystems must be the goal. Tundra, tropical lakes, mangroves, and temperate broadleaf forests are all unique expressions of biodiversity. Although they may not support the rich communities seen in tropical rainforests or coral reefs, they contain species assemblages adapted to distinct environmental conditions and reflect different evolutionary histories. To lose examples of these assemblages, and the ecological processes and evolutionary phenomena they contain, would represent an enormous loss of biodiversity. Although conservation action typically takes place at the country level, patterns of biodiversity and ecological processes (e.g., migration) do not conform to political boundaries. Thus, we used the ecoregion as the unit of analysis in creating the Global 200.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Jun 17, 1998

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