The geologic record of climatic change

The geologic record of climatic change This paper reviews the principal results from paleoclimate studies and includes background material slanted toward climate modelers. The inferred temperature history of the last 4.6 billion years indicates major changes in the components of the earth's climate system. A secular change in global insolation receipt is due to a 20–30% increase in solar luminosity since the formation of the earth. A CO2‐H2O greenhouse effect may have offset the lower luminosity during early earth history. Inferred fluctuations of global temperature have occurred over a broad range of time scales. On time scales of 106–108 years, paleogeographic factors (e.g., continental drift and sea level changes) have contributed significantly to temperature changes associated with transitions between nonglacial and glacial states. Preliminary modeling efforts indicate that additional factors (e.g., CO2, changes in atmospheric circulation) must also be considered in order to explain the origin of nonglacial climates. The origin of polar ice caps may result from ocean circulation changes that were caused by plate tectonic processes. Fluctuations of ice volume on a time scale of 10³–105 years correlate with insolation variations caused by orbital perturbations. Feedback interactions within the land‐sea‐air‐ice system (e.g., ocean circulation changes and bedrock dynamics) have been responsible for a significant modulation of the orbital signal. Ice ages may be due to orbitally induced temperature changes superimposed on a global cooling of terrestrial origin. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews of Geophysics Wiley

The geologic record of climatic change

Reviews of Geophysics, Volume 21 (4) – May 1, 1983

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
8755-1209
eISSN
1944-9208
DOI
10.1029/RG021i004p00828
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper reviews the principal results from paleoclimate studies and includes background material slanted toward climate modelers. The inferred temperature history of the last 4.6 billion years indicates major changes in the components of the earth's climate system. A secular change in global insolation receipt is due to a 20–30% increase in solar luminosity since the formation of the earth. A CO2‐H2O greenhouse effect may have offset the lower luminosity during early earth history. Inferred fluctuations of global temperature have occurred over a broad range of time scales. On time scales of 106–108 years, paleogeographic factors (e.g., continental drift and sea level changes) have contributed significantly to temperature changes associated with transitions between nonglacial and glacial states. Preliminary modeling efforts indicate that additional factors (e.g., CO2, changes in atmospheric circulation) must also be considered in order to explain the origin of nonglacial climates. The origin of polar ice caps may result from ocean circulation changes that were caused by plate tectonic processes. Fluctuations of ice volume on a time scale of 10³–105 years correlate with insolation variations caused by orbital perturbations. Feedback interactions within the land‐sea‐air‐ice system (e.g., ocean circulation changes and bedrock dynamics) have been responsible for a significant modulation of the orbital signal. Ice ages may be due to orbitally induced temperature changes superimposed on a global cooling of terrestrial origin.

Journal

Reviews of GeophysicsWiley

Published: May 1, 1983

References

  • Early crustal genesis
    Ashwal, Ashwal
  • The surface of the ice‐age earth
  • Modeling the ice‐age climate
    Gates, Gates
  • Twenty‐three year cycle in surface temperatures during the Maunder Minimum
    Hameed, Hameed; Wyant, Wyant
  • The solar cycle
    Newkirk, Newkirk; Frazier, Frazier
  • Energy balance climate models
    North, North; Cahalan, Cahalan; Coakley, Coakley
  • Ice‐age geodynamics
    Peltier, Peltier
  • A critical look at long‐term sun‐weather relationships
    Pittock, Pittock
  • Origin and evolution of planetary atmospheres
    Pollack, Pollack; Yung, Yung
  • The enigma of the extinction of the dinosaurs
    Russell, Russell
  • Paleoecological transfer functions
    Sachs, Sachs; Webb, Webb; Clark, Clark
  • The history of the earth's surface temperature during the past 100 million years
    Savin, Savin

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