The generation of runoff from subarctic snowpacks

The generation of runoff from subarctic snowpacks A physically based model of the movement of water through snowpacks was used to calculate hydrographs generated by diurnal waves of snowmelt on the tundra and in the boreal forest of subarctic Labrador. The model was tested against measured hydrographs from hillside plots that sampled a range of aspect, gradient and length, vegetative cover, and snow depth and density. The model yielded good results, particularly in the prediction of peak runoff rates, though there was a slight overestimate of the lag time. A comparison of predictions with field measurements indicated that given the ranges over which each of the controls is likely to vary, the two most critical factors controlling the hydrograph are the snow depth and the melt rate, which must be predicted precisely for short time intervals. Permeability of the snowpack is another important control, but it can be estimated closely from published values. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

The generation of runoff from subarctic snowpacks

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/WR012i004p00677
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A physically based model of the movement of water through snowpacks was used to calculate hydrographs generated by diurnal waves of snowmelt on the tundra and in the boreal forest of subarctic Labrador. The model was tested against measured hydrographs from hillside plots that sampled a range of aspect, gradient and length, vegetative cover, and snow depth and density. The model yielded good results, particularly in the prediction of peak runoff rates, though there was a slight overestimate of the lag time. A comparison of predictions with field measurements indicated that given the ranges over which each of the controls is likely to vary, the two most critical factors controlling the hydrograph are the snow depth and the melt rate, which must be predicted precisely for short time intervals. Permeability of the snowpack is another important control, but it can be estimated closely from published values.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1976

References

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