The experience of being a victim of prejudice: An experimental approach 1

The experience of being a victim of prejudice: An experimental approach 1 Most research on prejudice has followed the unidirectional orientation of investigating why majority‐group members become prejudiced toward minorities without considering the effects of prejudice and discrimination upon its victims, the members of minority and subordinate groups. Taking a bidirectional perspective, it is argued that comprehending prejudice will also require knowing how minority members respond to prejudice and defend themselves against it. Various methods for exploring the phenomenon of prejudice from the perspective of the minority member are surveyed. In particular, a recently devised technique for experimentally manipulating perceived prejudice and assessing its psychological consequences is presented along with the findings from several studies using members of different minority groups as subjects. After considering the impact of perceived prejudice upon stereotypic self‐evaluations, self‐esteem, and affect, some directions for further research into the “victimology” of prejudice are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Psychology Wiley

The experience of being a victim of prejudice: An experimental approach 1

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1978 International Union of Psychological Science
ISSN
0020-7594
eISSN
1464-066X
DOI
10.1080/00207597808246625
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most research on prejudice has followed the unidirectional orientation of investigating why majority‐group members become prejudiced toward minorities without considering the effects of prejudice and discrimination upon its victims, the members of minority and subordinate groups. Taking a bidirectional perspective, it is argued that comprehending prejudice will also require knowing how minority members respond to prejudice and defend themselves against it. Various methods for exploring the phenomenon of prejudice from the perspective of the minority member are surveyed. In particular, a recently devised technique for experimentally manipulating perceived prejudice and assessing its psychological consequences is presented along with the findings from several studies using members of different minority groups as subjects. After considering the impact of perceived prejudice upon stereotypic self‐evaluations, self‐esteem, and affect, some directions for further research into the “victimology” of prejudice are discussed.

Journal

International Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1978

References

  • Sex‐role stereotypes: A current appraisal
    Broverman, Broverman; Vogel, Vogel; Broverman, Broverman; Clarkson, Clarkson; Rosenkrantz, Rosenkrantz

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