The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate causes filopodia formation in cultured hippocampal astrocytes

The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate causes filopodia formation in cultured hippocampal... Can neurons induce surrounding glia to provide a more favorable microenvironment? Synapses and nerve growth cones have been shown to release neurotransmitters (Hume et al. Nature 1983;305:632–634; Kater et al. Trends Neurosci. 1988;11:315–321; Young and Poo Nature 1983;305:634–637) providing a possible mechanism for this type of control. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate induces an increase in the number of filopodia on the surface of astrocytes cultured from the neonatal rat hippocampus. This seems to be associated with a receptor‐mediated event that is activated to a lesser degree by the quisqualate and kainate, but not NMDA receptors. In addition, time‐lapse video recordings have revealed a rapid extension of filopodia from the apical margins of cells treated with glutamate. The apical margins of glutamate‐treated cells studied with electron microscopy contained dense cortical actin networks that are devoid of microtubules. Coated pits are often seen to invaginate from the the apical membrane in the vicinity of filopodia. A receptor‐binding step may be followed by a rapid reorganization of cortical actin resulting in actin‐containing filopodia. This process may be mediated by inositol lipid hydrolysis. Pyramidal neurons settled on glial cultures induced filopodia to form around the entire margin of growth cones and neurite tips suggesting that these events might occur in situ. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Glia Wiley

The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate causes filopodia formation in cultured hippocampal astrocytes

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0894-1491
eISSN
1098-1136
DOI
10.1002/glia.440030503
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Can neurons induce surrounding glia to provide a more favorable microenvironment? Synapses and nerve growth cones have been shown to release neurotransmitters (Hume et al. Nature 1983;305:632–634; Kater et al. Trends Neurosci. 1988;11:315–321; Young and Poo Nature 1983;305:634–637) providing a possible mechanism for this type of control. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate induces an increase in the number of filopodia on the surface of astrocytes cultured from the neonatal rat hippocampus. This seems to be associated with a receptor‐mediated event that is activated to a lesser degree by the quisqualate and kainate, but not NMDA receptors. In addition, time‐lapse video recordings have revealed a rapid extension of filopodia from the apical margins of cells treated with glutamate. The apical margins of glutamate‐treated cells studied with electron microscopy contained dense cortical actin networks that are devoid of microtubules. Coated pits are often seen to invaginate from the the apical membrane in the vicinity of filopodia. A receptor‐binding step may be followed by a rapid reorganization of cortical actin resulting in actin‐containing filopodia. This process may be mediated by inositol lipid hydrolysis. Pyramidal neurons settled on glial cultures induced filopodia to form around the entire margin of growth cones and neurite tips suggesting that these events might occur in situ.

Journal

GliaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1990

References

  • Brain astrocytes express region‐specific surface glycoproteins in culture
    Barbin, Barbin; Katz, Katz; Chamak, Chamak; Glowinski, Glowinski; Prochiantz, Prochiantz
  • Glutamate neurotoxicity in cortical culture
    Choi, Choi; Maulucci‐Gede, Maulucci‐Gede; Kriegstein, Kriegstein
  • Astroglial cells provide a template for the positioning of developing cerebellar neurons in vitro
    Hatten, Hatten; Liem, Liem
  • Growth of neurites without filopodial or lamellipodial activity in the presence of cytochalasin B
    Marsh, Marsh; Letourneau, Letourneau
  • Removal of glass coverslips from cultures flat embedded in epoxy resins using hydrofluoric acid
    Moore, Moore
  • Histogenesis of mouse cerebellum in microwell cultures: Cell reaggregation and migration, fiber and synapse formation
    Trenkner, Trenkner; Sidman, Sidman
  • Molecular basis of growth cone adhesion: Anchoring and adheron‐containing filaments at adhesive loci
    Tsui, Tsui; Schubert, Schubert; Klein, Klein

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