The evolving technology of DNA fingerprinting and its application to fisheries and aquaculture

The evolving technology of DNA fingerprinting and its application to fisheries and aquaculture In 1985, Alec Jeffreys reported the development of multilocus DNA fingerprinting by Southern blot‐detection of hypervariable minisatellites or variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci. This technology found immediate application to various forensic and scientific problems, including fisheries and aquaculture. By 1989, however, it was recognized by many researchers that inherent problems exist in the application of multilocus fingerprinting to large sample sizes as might occur in fisheries and aquaculture genetic studies. As such, individual VNTRs were cloned for single‐locus DNA fingerprinting. Although single‐locus fingerprinting ameliorates many of the problems associated with multilocus DNA fingerprinting, it suffers from the problem that electrophorectic anomalies of band migration within and between gels necessitates binning of alleles, thus underestimating genetic variability in a given population. Amplification of microsatellite loci by the polymerase chain reaction, however, solved many of the problems of Southern blot‐based DNA fingerprinting. Moreover, microsatellites exhibit attributes that make them particularly suitable as genetic markers for numerous applications in aquaculture and fisheries research: (1) they are abundant in the genome; (2) they display varying levels of polymorphism; (3) alleles exhibit codominant Mendelian inheritance; (4) minute amounts of tissue are required for assay (e.g., dried scales or otoliths); (5) loci are conserved in related species; (6) potential for automated assay. Recent innovations in DNA fingerprinting technology developed over the past 5 years are discussed with special emphasis on microsatellites and their application to fisheries and aquaculture, e.g., behavioural and population genetics of wild species, and selection and breeding programmes for aquaculture broodstock. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Fish Biology Wiley

The evolving technology of DNA fingerprinting and its application to fisheries and aquaculture

Journal of Fish Biology, Volume 47 – Dec 1, 1995

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1112
eISSN
1095-8649
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1095-8649.1995.tb06042.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1985, Alec Jeffreys reported the development of multilocus DNA fingerprinting by Southern blot‐detection of hypervariable minisatellites or variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci. This technology found immediate application to various forensic and scientific problems, including fisheries and aquaculture. By 1989, however, it was recognized by many researchers that inherent problems exist in the application of multilocus fingerprinting to large sample sizes as might occur in fisheries and aquaculture genetic studies. As such, individual VNTRs were cloned for single‐locus DNA fingerprinting. Although single‐locus fingerprinting ameliorates many of the problems associated with multilocus DNA fingerprinting, it suffers from the problem that electrophorectic anomalies of band migration within and between gels necessitates binning of alleles, thus underestimating genetic variability in a given population. Amplification of microsatellite loci by the polymerase chain reaction, however, solved many of the problems of Southern blot‐based DNA fingerprinting. Moreover, microsatellites exhibit attributes that make them particularly suitable as genetic markers for numerous applications in aquaculture and fisheries research: (1) they are abundant in the genome; (2) they display varying levels of polymorphism; (3) alleles exhibit codominant Mendelian inheritance; (4) minute amounts of tissue are required for assay (e.g., dried scales or otoliths); (5) loci are conserved in related species; (6) potential for automated assay. Recent innovations in DNA fingerprinting technology developed over the past 5 years are discussed with special emphasis on microsatellites and their application to fisheries and aquaculture, e.g., behavioural and population genetics of wild species, and selection and breeding programmes for aquaculture broodstock.

Journal

Journal of Fish BiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1995

References

  • DNA fingerprints of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus: A population comparison
    Baker, Baker; MacCarthy, MacCarthy; Smith, Smith; Perry, Perry; Chambers, Chambers
  • Enzymatic amplification of synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides: Implications for triplet repeat expansions in the human genome
    Behn‐Krappa, Behn‐Krappa; Doerfler, Doerfler
  • Population genetics of Atlantic cod using amplified single locus minisatellite VNTR analysis
    Galvin, Galvin; Sadusky, Sadusky; McGregor, McGregor; Cross, Cross
  • DNA fingerprint based analysis of paternal and maternal effects on offspring growth and survival in communally reared rainbow trout
    Herbinger, Herbinger; Doyle, Doyle; Pitman, Pitman; Paquet, Paquet; Mesa, Mesa; Morris, Morris; Wright, Wright; Cook, Cook
  • Multilocus DNA fingerprinting detects population differentiation in the outbred and abundant fish species
    Laughlin, Laughlin; Turner, Turner
  • Isolation of microsatellite loci in Atlantic salmon and their application to the population genetics of Canadian East coast stocks
    McConnell, McConnell; Hamilton, Hamilton; Morris, Morris; Cook, Cook; Paquet, Paquet; Bentzen, Bentzen; Wright, Wright
  • Microsatellite analysis of genetic variation in black bear populations
    Paetkau, Paetkau; Strobeck, Strobeck
  • An optimized method for isolating and sequencing large (CA/GT) n (n > 40) microsatellites from genomic DNA
    Rico, Rico; Rico, Rico; Hewitt, Hewitt
  • Dinucleotide‐repeat polymorphism in DNA of rainbow trout and its application in fisheries science
    Sakamoto, Sakamoto; Okamoto, Okamoto; Ikeda, Ikeda; Nakamura, Nakamura; Sato, Sato
  • Isolation and characterization of (GT) n repetitive sequences from Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L
    Slettan, Slettan; Olsaker, Olsaker; Lic, Lic
  • Hypervariable minisatellite DNA single locus probes for the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L
    Taggart, Taggart; Ferguson, Ferguson
  • Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited
    Valdes, Valdes; Slatkin, Slatkin; Freimer, Freimer

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