The Emergence of Hypertext and Problem Solving: An Experimental Investigation of Accessing and Using Information from Linear versus Nonlinear Systems *

The Emergence of Hypertext and Problem Solving: An Experimental Investigation of Accessing and... ABSTRACT Past research suggests that problem solving and/or decision behavior can be altered and improved by the changes in the way information is accessed and displayed. Also, researchers have found that the usefulness of different information display formats are contingent on the characteristics of the problem task. This research investigated the impact on problem solving when accessing and using information from linear and nonlinear systems. Also, the research investigated problem‐solving performance of linear and nonlinear systems when applied to different combinations of problem tasks. In a laboratory setting, linear and nonlinear systems were developed to conduct this experiment. This experiment used 64 graduate business students in a two‐factor repeated‐measures design employing a multivariate analysis of variance to analyze the data. Repeated measures were conducted to analyze the experimental group under both linear and nonlinear treatments. The findings from the study support the notion that the nonlinear system resulted in superior problem solving and higher levels of user satisfaction than the linear system. Specifically, the nonlinear system enabled users to make faster and more accurate decisions on perceptual problem tasks than did the linear system. For analytical problem tasks, users performed faster with the nonlinear system; however, there was no significant difference in accuracy. User satisfaction was higher with the nonlinear system under both perceptual and analytical tasks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Decision Sciences Wiley

The Emergence of Hypertext and Problem Solving: An Experimental Investigation of Accessing and Using Information from Linear versus Nonlinear Systems *

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0011-7315
eISSN
1540-5915
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-5915.1997.tb01333.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Past research suggests that problem solving and/or decision behavior can be altered and improved by the changes in the way information is accessed and displayed. Also, researchers have found that the usefulness of different information display formats are contingent on the characteristics of the problem task. This research investigated the impact on problem solving when accessing and using information from linear and nonlinear systems. Also, the research investigated problem‐solving performance of linear and nonlinear systems when applied to different combinations of problem tasks. In a laboratory setting, linear and nonlinear systems were developed to conduct this experiment. This experiment used 64 graduate business students in a two‐factor repeated‐measures design employing a multivariate analysis of variance to analyze the data. Repeated measures were conducted to analyze the experimental group under both linear and nonlinear treatments. The findings from the study support the notion that the nonlinear system resulted in superior problem solving and higher levels of user satisfaction than the linear system. Specifically, the nonlinear system enabled users to make faster and more accurate decisions on perceptual problem tasks than did the linear system. For analytical problem tasks, users performed faster with the nonlinear system; however, there was no significant difference in accuracy. User satisfaction was higher with the nonlinear system under both perceptual and analytical tasks.

Journal

Decision SciencesWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1997

References

  • Understanding the effectiveness of computer graphics for decision support: A cumulative experimental approach
    Dickson, Dickson; DeSanctis, DeSanctis; McBride, McBride
  • HDM: A model‐based approach to hypertext application design
    Garzotto, Garzotto; Paolini, Paolini; Schwabe, Schwabe
  • Hypertext design environments and the hypertext design process
    Nanard, Nanard; Nanard, Nanard
  • An experimental evaluation of the impact of data display format on recall performance
    Umanath, Umanath; Scammell, Scammell
  • An examination of two screen/report design variables in an information recall context
    Umanath, Umanath; Scammell, Scammell; Das, Das
  • Multiattribute data presentation and human judgment: A cognitive fit perspective
    Umanath, Umanath; Vessey, Vessey
  • Cognitive fit: A theory‐based analysis of the graph versus tables literature
    Vessey, Vessey

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