The effects of soil piping on contributing areas and erosion patterns

The effects of soil piping on contributing areas and erosion patterns Natural piping doubles the dynamic contributing area on the upper Maesnant stream in mid‐Wales, mainly through linking points well beyond the riparian zones of seepage to the stream. Both discharge and sediment transport rates in the major pipes are closely related to the size of shallow surface microtopographic hollows in which they lie, and which themselves are largely created by piping erosion. However, pipe dischrges are frequently generated by contributing areas larger than these surface depressions and some pipes run counter to the surface topography. The redistribution and acceleration of hillslope drainage processes by piping has implications for theories of hillslope development, especially through plan‐form modifications, and also for channel discharge and erosion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Wiley

The effects of soil piping on contributing areas and erosion patterns

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0197-9337
eISSN
1096-9837
DOI
10.1002/esp.3290120303
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Natural piping doubles the dynamic contributing area on the upper Maesnant stream in mid‐Wales, mainly through linking points well beyond the riparian zones of seepage to the stream. Both discharge and sediment transport rates in the major pipes are closely related to the size of shallow surface microtopographic hollows in which they lie, and which themselves are largely created by piping erosion. However, pipe dischrges are frequently generated by contributing areas larger than these surface depressions and some pipes run counter to the surface topography. The redistribution and acceleration of hillslope drainage processes by piping has implications for theories of hillslope development, especially through plan‐form modifications, and also for channel discharge and erosion.

Journal

Earth Surface Processes and LandformsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1987

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

  • Hillslope Hydrology
    Dunne, T.

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