The effects of physical attractiveness, sex, and attitude similarity on interpersonal attraction1

The effects of physical attractiveness, sex, and attitude similarity on interpersonal attraction1 1. This research was supported in part by Research Grant MH-uI78-02 from the National Institute of Mental Health, United States Public Health Service. The authors wish to thank Lowell Parsons for his assistance in this research. 2. On leave, 1966-1967, as a visiting professor at Stanford University. 3. Now at Colorado State University. 4. Now at the Baylor University School of Medicine. Donn Byrne, Oliver london, and Keith Reeves them. It is the latter class of variables to which the present research is directed. It is clear from a number of types of research that interpersonal responses are in part determined by such variables as quality of clothing (Roult, 1954; Lefkowitz, Blake, & Mouton, 1955), race (Wong, 1961), and voice quality (Lerner, 1965). In the experimental investigation of attraction, the possible effects of such stimulus attributes of the target person have generally been controlled by having the same confederate play different roles across conditions (e.g., Altrocchi, 1959; Byrne & Griffitt, 1966; Schachter, 1951) or by the use of written material to eliminate observation (e.g., Byrne, 1961). For much the same reasons, almost all attraction experiments have dealt with same-sex rather than opposite-sex attraction (e.g., Aronson & Linder, 1965; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Personality Wiley

The effects of physical attractiveness, sex, and attitude similarity on interpersonal attraction1

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0022-3506
eISSN
1467-6494
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-6494.1968.tb01473.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. This research was supported in part by Research Grant MH-uI78-02 from the National Institute of Mental Health, United States Public Health Service. The authors wish to thank Lowell Parsons for his assistance in this research. 2. On leave, 1966-1967, as a visiting professor at Stanford University. 3. Now at Colorado State University. 4. Now at the Baylor University School of Medicine. Donn Byrne, Oliver london, and Keith Reeves them. It is the latter class of variables to which the present research is directed. It is clear from a number of types of research that interpersonal responses are in part determined by such variables as quality of clothing (Roult, 1954; Lefkowitz, Blake, & Mouton, 1955), race (Wong, 1961), and voice quality (Lerner, 1965). In the experimental investigation of attraction, the possible effects of such stimulus attributes of the target person have generally been controlled by having the same confederate play different roles across conditions (e.g., Altrocchi, 1959; Byrne & Griffitt, 1966; Schachter, 1951) or by the use of written material to eliminate observation (e.g., Byrne, 1961). For much the same reasons, almost all attraction experiments have dealt with same-sex rather than opposite-sex attraction (e.g., Aronson & Linder, 1965;

Journal

Journal of PersonalityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1968

References

  • Interpersonal attraction and attitude similarity
    Byrne, D
  • Response to attitude similarity‐dissimilarity as a function of affiliation need
    Byrne, D

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