The Effect of Incremental Reserve Design and Changing Reservation Goals on the Long‐Term Efficiency of Reserve Systems

The Effect of Incremental Reserve Design and Changing Reservation Goals on the Long‐Term... Abstract: Selecting reserve areas based on percentages, such as 10% or 12% of a bioregion, is common in conservation planning despite widespread admission that such percentages are arbitrary and likely to be inadequate for the conservation of all biodiversity. Reserve systems based on these relatively low percentage targets are likely to require expansion in the future, resulting in the assembly of reserve systems over many years (incremental reserve design). How then will incremental reserve design, such as increasing percentage targets over time, affect the long‐term efficiency of marine reserve systems? We used South Australia as a case study to investigate how changing percentage targets affects the contribution of individual planning units to efficient reserve design. Selection frequency counts provided a measure of a planning unit's conservation value. For the majority of planning units, changing targets led to a change in their conservation value indicating, for example, that planning units identified as high‐value sites at a low‐percentage conservation target may be of lesser importance when targets are increased. Despite the variability in the value of individual planning units at different targets, there was no loss in efficiency from incremental design of reserve systems based on systematic methods compared with purpose‐built reserve systems (i.e., the system is assembled in a single iteration). The exception was when incrementally designed systems were based on South Australia's existing marine reserve system—a system developed in an ad hoc method. The result was reserve systems that were less efficient, less compact, and larger in size. This suggests that systematic approaches have an important role for efficient reserve design when there is uncertainty about the target level of reservation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

The Effect of Incremental Reserve Design and Changing Reservation Goals on the Long‐Term Efficiency of Reserve Systems

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.2006.00618.x
pmid
17391185
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Selecting reserve areas based on percentages, such as 10% or 12% of a bioregion, is common in conservation planning despite widespread admission that such percentages are arbitrary and likely to be inadequate for the conservation of all biodiversity. Reserve systems based on these relatively low percentage targets are likely to require expansion in the future, resulting in the assembly of reserve systems over many years (incremental reserve design). How then will incremental reserve design, such as increasing percentage targets over time, affect the long‐term efficiency of marine reserve systems? We used South Australia as a case study to investigate how changing percentage targets affects the contribution of individual planning units to efficient reserve design. Selection frequency counts provided a measure of a planning unit's conservation value. For the majority of planning units, changing targets led to a change in their conservation value indicating, for example, that planning units identified as high‐value sites at a low‐percentage conservation target may be of lesser importance when targets are increased. Despite the variability in the value of individual planning units at different targets, there was no loss in efficiency from incremental design of reserve systems based on systematic methods compared with purpose‐built reserve systems (i.e., the system is assembled in a single iteration). The exception was when incrementally designed systems were based on South Australia's existing marine reserve system—a system developed in an ad hoc method. The result was reserve systems that were less efficient, less compact, and larger in size. This suggests that systematic approaches have an important role for efficient reserve design when there is uncertainty about the target level of reservation.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2007

References

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