The effect of extreme weather events on hair cortisol and body weight in a wild ring‐tailed lemur population (Lemur catta) in southwestern Madagascar

The effect of extreme weather events on hair cortisol and body weight in a wild ring‐tailed... INTRODUCTIONThe climate of a region is determined by the mean and variability of relevant weather variables (e.g. rainfall, temperature, humidity) over time. Extreme weather events are generally described as weather that is above or below a range of observed values across a historical period for a given region (e.g., its local climate, [Lavell et al., ]). Extreme weather events exceed normal seasonal variation and are often the result of hydroclimatic extremes that include droughts, characterized by abnormally low rainfall and tropical cyclones (i.e., hurricanes in North America), a kind of tropical storm with extreme wind and rainfall (Lavell et al., ). As noted by an increasing number of researchers, it is essential to understand not only the effects of anthropogenic change on primate biology and behavior, but also their responses to naturally occurring disturbances such as extreme weather events, (Lewis & Rakotondranaivo, ; Milton & Giacalone, ; Ratsimbazafy, ). A global survey investigating how different terrestrial mammals are exposed to extreme weather events showed that there are 40 primate species highly exposed to cyclones and 55 highly exposed to drought (y Juárez, Mace, Cowlishaw, Cornforth, & Pettorelli, ). According to this survey, 75% of the land in these species’ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Primatology Wiley

The effect of extreme weather events on hair cortisol and body weight in a wild ring‐tailed lemur population (Lemur catta) in southwestern Madagascar

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0275-2565
eISSN
1098-2345
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajp.22731
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe climate of a region is determined by the mean and variability of relevant weather variables (e.g. rainfall, temperature, humidity) over time. Extreme weather events are generally described as weather that is above or below a range of observed values across a historical period for a given region (e.g., its local climate, [Lavell et al., ]). Extreme weather events exceed normal seasonal variation and are often the result of hydroclimatic extremes that include droughts, characterized by abnormally low rainfall and tropical cyclones (i.e., hurricanes in North America), a kind of tropical storm with extreme wind and rainfall (Lavell et al., ). As noted by an increasing number of researchers, it is essential to understand not only the effects of anthropogenic change on primate biology and behavior, but also their responses to naturally occurring disturbances such as extreme weather events, (Lewis & Rakotondranaivo, ; Milton & Giacalone, ; Ratsimbazafy, ). A global survey investigating how different terrestrial mammals are exposed to extreme weather events showed that there are 40 primate species highly exposed to cyclones and 55 highly exposed to drought (y Juárez, Mace, Cowlishaw, Cornforth, & Pettorelli, ). According to this survey, 75% of the land in these species’

Journal

American Journal of PrimatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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