THE EFFECT OF AGE ON THE NON‐HAEMIN IRON IN THE HUMAN BRAIN

THE EFFECT OF AGE ON THE NON‐HAEMIN IRON IN THE HUMAN BRAIN Institute of Medical Chemistry and Institute of Pathology, University of Uppsala, Sweden (Received 26 March 1958) IRONis found in the normal brain as haemin iron in haemoglobin and in ironcontaining enzymes and as non-haemin iron. At least part of the non-haemin iron can be shown by histochemical methods, the prussian blue and Turnbull blue reactions being most commonly used to demonstrate it. GUIZZEITI (1915) examined the iron reactions seen when thick, macroscopic brain sections were treated with potassium ferrocyanide or ammonium sulphide. He found that certain parts of the brain gave a stronger staining reaction than others: the globus pallidus, substantia nigra, red nucleus and dentate nucleus were most intensely stained. The most extensive and systematic investigations of histologically demonstrable iron in the brain were (1922). Using thick, macroscopic sections SPATZ was able to conducted by SPATZ divide the centres of the central nervous system into four groups according to their iron content. The first group comprised the globus pallidus and substantia nigra, which gave the most intense and invariable iron reaction. The red nucleus, putamen, caudate nucleus, dentate nucleus and the subthalamic body, with constant but somewhat weaker staining properties, formed the second group. The structures included http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurochemistry Wiley

THE EFFECT OF AGE ON THE NON‐HAEMIN IRON IN THE HUMAN BRAIN

Journal of Neurochemistry, Volume 3 (1) – Oct 1, 1958

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3042
eISSN
1471-4159
DOI
10.1111/j.1471-4159.1958.tb12607.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Institute of Medical Chemistry and Institute of Pathology, University of Uppsala, Sweden (Received 26 March 1958) IRONis found in the normal brain as haemin iron in haemoglobin and in ironcontaining enzymes and as non-haemin iron. At least part of the non-haemin iron can be shown by histochemical methods, the prussian blue and Turnbull blue reactions being most commonly used to demonstrate it. GUIZZEITI (1915) examined the iron reactions seen when thick, macroscopic brain sections were treated with potassium ferrocyanide or ammonium sulphide. He found that certain parts of the brain gave a stronger staining reaction than others: the globus pallidus, substantia nigra, red nucleus and dentate nucleus were most intensely stained. The most extensive and systematic investigations of histologically demonstrable iron in the brain were (1922). Using thick, macroscopic sections SPATZ was able to conducted by SPATZ divide the centres of the central nervous system into four groups according to their iron content. The first group comprised the globus pallidus and substantia nigra, which gave the most intense and invariable iron reaction. The red nucleus, putamen, caudate nucleus, dentate nucleus and the subthalamic body, with constant but somewhat weaker staining properties, formed the second group. The structures included

Journal

Journal of NeurochemistryWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1958

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