The Early Development of Forest Fragmentation Effects on Birds

The Early Development of Forest Fragmentation Effects on Birds The early development of forest fragmentation effects on forest organisms is poorly understood partly because most fragmentation studies have been done in agricultural or suburban landscapes, long after the onset of fragmentation. We develop a temporal model of forest fragmentation effects on densities of forest‐breeding birds and provide data from an active industrial forest landscape to test the model. The model and our empirical data indicate that densities of several forest‐dwelling bird species can increase within a forest stand soon after the onset of fragmentation as a result of displaced individuals packing into remaining habitat. Along with higher densities in the newly formed fragments, pairing success in one species, the Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus), was lower in fragments than nonfragments, possibly due to behavioral dysfunction resulting from high densities. Thus, density was inversely related to productivity. The duration and extent of increased densities following onset of fragmentation depends on many factors, including the sensitivity of a species to edge and area effects, the duration and rate of habitat loss and fragmentation, and the proximity of a forest stand to the disturbance. Incipient forest fragmentation may affect populations differently from later stages of fragmentation when the geometry of the landscape has reached a more stable configuration. Our model and data indicate, for reasons unrelated to traditional edge effects, that large tracts of forest can be important because they are relatively free from the variety of plant and animal population dynamics that might take place near new edges, including the encroachment of individuals displaced by habitat loss. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

The Early Development of Forest Fragmentation Effects on Birds

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-early-development-of-forest-fragmentation-effects-on-birds-6nyHL5JKay
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1996.10010188.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The early development of forest fragmentation effects on forest organisms is poorly understood partly because most fragmentation studies have been done in agricultural or suburban landscapes, long after the onset of fragmentation. We develop a temporal model of forest fragmentation effects on densities of forest‐breeding birds and provide data from an active industrial forest landscape to test the model. The model and our empirical data indicate that densities of several forest‐dwelling bird species can increase within a forest stand soon after the onset of fragmentation as a result of displaced individuals packing into remaining habitat. Along with higher densities in the newly formed fragments, pairing success in one species, the Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus), was lower in fragments than nonfragments, possibly due to behavioral dysfunction resulting from high densities. Thus, density was inversely related to productivity. The duration and extent of increased densities following onset of fragmentation depends on many factors, including the sensitivity of a species to edge and area effects, the duration and rate of habitat loss and fragmentation, and the proximity of a forest stand to the disturbance. Incipient forest fragmentation may affect populations differently from later stages of fragmentation when the geometry of the landscape has reached a more stable configuration. Our model and data indicate, for reasons unrelated to traditional edge effects, that large tracts of forest can be important because they are relatively free from the variety of plant and animal population dynamics that might take place near new edges, including the encroachment of individuals displaced by habitat loss.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1996

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off