The crisis of public trust in governance and institutions: Implications for nursing leadership

The crisis of public trust in governance and institutions: Implications for nursing leadership Trust is a valuable social capital, essential for dependable relationships and a healthy society. It is hard earned, not guaranteed and easily lost (O'Neill, ). Historically public opinion has held the healthcare system and healthcare providers in high trust. There are indications that this trust may be on the decline—particularly trust in private healthcare. This decline reflects the global trend towards distrust of government and of institutional leadership. In recent years, a number of significant events and crises, such as the European migration crisis, the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom (UK) and the political polarisation of the United States of America (USA) following the Trump election have been characterised as watershed events in public leadership and trust (Brookes, ). Public trust in business, government, public institutions and their leadership are at an extraordinary all‐time low (Edelman, ). In a period when the delivery of healthcare is increasingly under scrutiny, and public trust in institutions is apparently in decay, understanding the contribution nurse leaders make to the public's trust in nursing is important. To date little to no attention has been given to the broader picture of nursing leadership and public trust in healthcare and healthcare institutions. Should nurse http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Nursing Management Wiley

The crisis of public trust in governance and institutions: Implications for nursing leadership

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0966-0429
eISSN
1365-2834
D.O.I.
10.1111/jonm.12625
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Trust is a valuable social capital, essential for dependable relationships and a healthy society. It is hard earned, not guaranteed and easily lost (O'Neill, ). Historically public opinion has held the healthcare system and healthcare providers in high trust. There are indications that this trust may be on the decline—particularly trust in private healthcare. This decline reflects the global trend towards distrust of government and of institutional leadership. In recent years, a number of significant events and crises, such as the European migration crisis, the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom (UK) and the political polarisation of the United States of America (USA) following the Trump election have been characterised as watershed events in public leadership and trust (Brookes, ). Public trust in business, government, public institutions and their leadership are at an extraordinary all‐time low (Edelman, ). In a period when the delivery of healthcare is increasingly under scrutiny, and public trust in institutions is apparently in decay, understanding the contribution nurse leaders make to the public's trust in nursing is important. To date little to no attention has been given to the broader picture of nursing leadership and public trust in healthcare and healthcare institutions. Should nurse

Journal

Journal of Nursing ManagementWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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