The corticosteroid laminitis story: 2. Science of if, when and how

The corticosteroid laminitis story: 2. Science of if, when and how Introduction Although a very useful and important group of medications used in equine medicine, glucocorticoids have been suggested by some authors to be associated with the risk of inducing acute laminitis when administered systemically (Lose 1980; Lawrence et al. 1985; Eustace and Redden 1990; Frederick and Kehl 2000; Ryu et al. 2004). This link has not been proven experimentally. Whether or not this might involve a direct effect of these drugs and, further, whether the risk is significant enough in the clinical setting to affect how and when these drugs are used, is currently a matter for debate. The report of a recent high-profile case, described in this issue (Dutton 2007), once again brings these questions into the spotlight. Evidence directly linking the administration of corticosteroids with the induction of laminitis is scarce. The reader is referred to previous reviews of the possible links between glucocorticoid therapy and laminitis (Johnson et al. 2002; Cornelisse and Robinson 2004). This review seeks to update the current evidence base on this subject, so that the potential risk of inducing laminitis by the systemic use of glucocorticoids can be more accurately assessed. Areas where further research is needed (epidemiological, clinical and/or on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Equine Veterinary Journal Wiley

The corticosteroid laminitis story: 2. Science of if, when and how

Equine Veterinary Journal, Volume 39 (1) – Jan 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-corticosteroid-laminitis-story-2-science-of-if-when-and-how-P2jKYKgpXN
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2007 EVJ Ltd
ISSN
0425-1644
eISSN
2042-3306
DOI
10.2746/042516407X166035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Although a very useful and important group of medications used in equine medicine, glucocorticoids have been suggested by some authors to be associated with the risk of inducing acute laminitis when administered systemically (Lose 1980; Lawrence et al. 1985; Eustace and Redden 1990; Frederick and Kehl 2000; Ryu et al. 2004). This link has not been proven experimentally. Whether or not this might involve a direct effect of these drugs and, further, whether the risk is significant enough in the clinical setting to affect how and when these drugs are used, is currently a matter for debate. The report of a recent high-profile case, described in this issue (Dutton 2007), once again brings these questions into the spotlight. Evidence directly linking the administration of corticosteroids with the induction of laminitis is scarce. The reader is referred to previous reviews of the possible links between glucocorticoid therapy and laminitis (Johnson et al. 2002; Cornelisse and Robinson 2004). This review seeks to update the current evidence base on this subject, so that the potential risk of inducing laminitis by the systemic use of glucocorticoids can be more accurately assessed. Areas where further research is needed (epidemiological, clinical and/or on

Journal

Equine Veterinary JournalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off