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The contribution of patient interviews to the identification of drug‐related problems in home medication review

The contribution of patient interviews to the identification of drug‐related problems in home... Summary What is known and Objective: To determine to what extent patient interviews contribute to the identification of drug‐related problems (DRPs) in home medication reviews, in terms of number, type and clinical relevance. Methods: We performed a cross‐sectional study within the intervention arm of a randomized controlled trial. Patients were recruited from 10 Dutch community pharmacies. Patients were eligible if they were home‐dwelling, aged 65 years and over and used five or more different drugs, including at least one cardiovascular or antidiabetic drug. The community pharmacist interviewed the patient at home about the medicines and identified potential DRPs in combination with medication and clinical records. This medication review was assessed and modified by an independent pharmacist reviewers’ panel. Outcomes were the number and type of DRPs and recommendations and percentage of clinical relevant DRPs. Clinical relevance of DRPs was assessed by DRPs assigned a high priority, DRPs followed by recommendations for drug change and DRPs followed by implemented recommendations for drug change. Results: A total of 1565 potential DRPs and recommendations (10 per patient).were identified for 155 patients (median age, 76 years; 54% women). Fifty‐eight per cent of all recommendations involved a drug change; 27% of all DRPs were identified during patient interviews and 74% from medication and clinical records. Compared to DRPs identified from patient medication and clinical records, DRPs identified during patient interviews were more frequently assigned a high priority (OR = 1·8 (1·4–2·2)), were more frequently associated with recommendations for drug change (OR = 2·4 (1·9–3·1)) and were implemented recommendations for drug change (OR = 2·8 (2·1–3·7)). What is new and Conclusion: This study shows that more than a quarter of all DRPs were identified during patient interviews. DRPs identified during patient interviews were more frequently assigned a higher clinical relevance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Pharmacy & Therapeutics Wiley

The contribution of patient interviews to the identification of drug‐related problems in home medication review

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References (31)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0269-4727
eISSN
1365-2710
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2710.2012.01370.x
pmid
22861493
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary What is known and Objective: To determine to what extent patient interviews contribute to the identification of drug‐related problems (DRPs) in home medication reviews, in terms of number, type and clinical relevance. Methods: We performed a cross‐sectional study within the intervention arm of a randomized controlled trial. Patients were recruited from 10 Dutch community pharmacies. Patients were eligible if they were home‐dwelling, aged 65 years and over and used five or more different drugs, including at least one cardiovascular or antidiabetic drug. The community pharmacist interviewed the patient at home about the medicines and identified potential DRPs in combination with medication and clinical records. This medication review was assessed and modified by an independent pharmacist reviewers’ panel. Outcomes were the number and type of DRPs and recommendations and percentage of clinical relevant DRPs. Clinical relevance of DRPs was assessed by DRPs assigned a high priority, DRPs followed by recommendations for drug change and DRPs followed by implemented recommendations for drug change. Results: A total of 1565 potential DRPs and recommendations (10 per patient).were identified for 155 patients (median age, 76 years; 54% women). Fifty‐eight per cent of all recommendations involved a drug change; 27% of all DRPs were identified during patient interviews and 74% from medication and clinical records. Compared to DRPs identified from patient medication and clinical records, DRPs identified during patient interviews were more frequently assigned a high priority (OR = 1·8 (1·4–2·2)), were more frequently associated with recommendations for drug change (OR = 2·4 (1·9–3·1)) and were implemented recommendations for drug change (OR = 2·8 (2·1–3·7)). What is new and Conclusion: This study shows that more than a quarter of all DRPs were identified during patient interviews. DRPs identified during patient interviews were more frequently assigned a higher clinical relevance.

Journal

Journal of Clinical Pharmacy & TherapeuticsWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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