The Context of Conservation Biology

The Context of Conservation Biology When the field of conservation biology developed in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the founders knew they had something different: they were beginning a “science of engagement” in addition to the traditional “science of discovery.” They clearly perceived that although society continues to need good science, it also needs that science to be applied to the large and growing set of problems that confront us, the all‐too‐familiar litany that includes species and habitat loss, toxification, invasive exotics, soil degradation, overexploitation, and an ever‐expanding human population that seeks global equity and fair access to a declining resource base. They knew we could no longer simply follow the traditional academic model—placing bricks in the wall of knowledge and claiming them to be available to whomever wants to use them—and still have much hope of altering the course of world events. They saw that changes in the way the world operates would not come about through passive building of that wall, but rather in taking knowledge and actively seeking out those who most need to use it. Thus, our crisis discipline clearly embraces and encourages application of what we know in a larger context. This journal (with others) has been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

The Context of Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology, Volume 15 (4) – Aug 3, 2001

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.2001.015004815.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

When the field of conservation biology developed in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the founders knew they had something different: they were beginning a “science of engagement” in addition to the traditional “science of discovery.” They clearly perceived that although society continues to need good science, it also needs that science to be applied to the large and growing set of problems that confront us, the all‐too‐familiar litany that includes species and habitat loss, toxification, invasive exotics, soil degradation, overexploitation, and an ever‐expanding human population that seeks global equity and fair access to a declining resource base. They knew we could no longer simply follow the traditional academic model—placing bricks in the wall of knowledge and claiming them to be available to whomever wants to use them—and still have much hope of altering the course of world events. They saw that changes in the way the world operates would not come about through passive building of that wall, but rather in taking knowledge and actively seeking out those who most need to use it. Thus, our crisis discipline clearly embraces and encourages application of what we know in a larger context. This journal (with others) has been

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Aug 3, 2001

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