THE CONCENTRATIONS OF FREE AMINO ACIDS AND OTHER ELECTROLYTES IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID, IN VIVO DIALYSATE OF BRAIN, AND BLOOD PLASMA OF THE DOG *

THE CONCENTRATIONS OF FREE AMINO ACIDS AND OTHER ELECTROLYTES IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID, IN VIVO... SUMMARY The concentrations of free amino acids in plasma, CSF and in vivo dialysates of peripheral blood (neck sac fluid) and central nervous tissue (brain sac fluid) from each of five dogs (neck sac fluid from four of five dogs) were determined by ion‐exchange chromatography. Dialysates were obtained by implanting small dialysis sacs filled with a dextran‐saline solution into the subcutaneous tissue of the neck or the parenchyma of the brain at least 10 weeks before sample collection. The mean plasma concentration of most amino acids was within the range of values reported in the literature for human or dog plasma. The concentrations of most amino acids were higher in the neck sac fluid than in plasma; this discrepancy, however, was, for the most part, small and could most likely be accounted for by falling plasma free amino acid levels prior to sample taking. Previous conclusions that the CSF concentrations of most amino acids are lower than plasma concentrations are confirmed, although the present work indicates that there may be considerable individual variation in the CSF/plasma distribution ratio with respect to most amino acids. In the brain sac fluid the concentration of nearly every amino acid was consistently higher than that in CSF and lower than that in the neck sac fluid. The potassium concentration in the brain sac fluid was significantly higher than, and the total osmolality significantly lower than, those in the neck sac fluid. On the assumption that the brain sac fluid represents a dialysate of the brain extracellular fluid, these results contradict recent findings (Bito and Davson, 1965; 1966) indicating that the potassium concentration of the cortex extracellular fluid is lower than that of ventricular or cisterna magna CSF and certainly lower than that of plasma. Because of this and on the basis of consideration of the reaction of the brain to a foreign body, the possibility that the implanted brain sac lay on the‘blood side’of the bloodbrain barrier was suggested. Some implications of this possibility are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurochemistry Wiley

THE CONCENTRATIONS OF FREE AMINO ACIDS AND OTHER ELECTROLYTES IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID, IN VIVO DIALYSATE OF BRAIN, AND BLOOD PLASMA OF THE DOG *

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3042
eISSN
1471-4159
DOI
10.1111/j.1471-4159.1966.tb04265.x
Publisher site
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Abstract

SUMMARY The concentrations of free amino acids in plasma, CSF and in vivo dialysates of peripheral blood (neck sac fluid) and central nervous tissue (brain sac fluid) from each of five dogs (neck sac fluid from four of five dogs) were determined by ion‐exchange chromatography. Dialysates were obtained by implanting small dialysis sacs filled with a dextran‐saline solution into the subcutaneous tissue of the neck or the parenchyma of the brain at least 10 weeks before sample collection. The mean plasma concentration of most amino acids was within the range of values reported in the literature for human or dog plasma. The concentrations of most amino acids were higher in the neck sac fluid than in plasma; this discrepancy, however, was, for the most part, small and could most likely be accounted for by falling plasma free amino acid levels prior to sample taking. Previous conclusions that the CSF concentrations of most amino acids are lower than plasma concentrations are confirmed, although the present work indicates that there may be considerable individual variation in the CSF/plasma distribution ratio with respect to most amino acids. In the brain sac fluid the concentration of nearly every amino acid was consistently higher than that in CSF and lower than that in the neck sac fluid. The potassium concentration in the brain sac fluid was significantly higher than, and the total osmolality significantly lower than, those in the neck sac fluid. On the assumption that the brain sac fluid represents a dialysate of the brain extracellular fluid, these results contradict recent findings (Bito and Davson, 1965; 1966) indicating that the potassium concentration of the cortex extracellular fluid is lower than that of ventricular or cisterna magna CSF and certainly lower than that of plasma. Because of this and on the basis of consideration of the reaction of the brain to a foreign body, the possibility that the implanted brain sac lay on the‘blood side’of the bloodbrain barrier was suggested. Some implications of this possibility are discussed.

Journal

Journal of NeurochemistryWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1966

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