The collision of the Indian plate with Asia: molecular evidence for its impact on the phylogeny of freshwater crabs (Brachyura: Potamidae)

The collision of the Indian plate with Asia: molecular evidence for its impact on the phylogeny... Aim We used molecular data to answer the following questions: (1) Is morphology‐based (and to some extent, geography‐based) classification of the freshwater crab family Potamidae congruent with a molecular phylogeny? (2) What historical biogeographical event could have shaped this phylogeny? Location Material from the entire geographical range of the family Potamidae was analysed, including specimens from East Asia (China, Taiwan, the Ryukyus), Southeast Asia, South Asia (northern India, the Middle East and Near East), North Africa, and southern Europe. Methods Mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding 503 base pairs (excluding the variable regions) of the large subunit rRNA (16S rRNA) gene were obtained from 72 species belonging to 49 potamid genera, representing 51% of all known genera in this species‐rich family. Sequences were compared by means of phylogenetic analyses (minimum evolution, Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony) and Bayesian relaxed molecular clock estimates. Results The family Potamidae was found to be monophyletic with two major lineages, and there was support for the recognition of two mostly allopatric subfamilies, Potaminae and Potamiscinae. This is largely consistent with the current classification proposed. The ‘Potamiscinae’ clade comprised three subclades: (1) a well‐supported ‘eastern Asia’ subclade that included species from the eastern part of the range (China, Taiwan, the Ryukyus, the Philippines, Indochina, Malay Peninsula, northern India and Myanmar/Burma); (2) a weakly supported ‘Sunda Shelf islands’ subclade that included species from the larger Southeast Asian islands on the Sunda Shelf (Borneo, Sumatra and Java); and (3) a ‘Socotra’ subclade that comprised only Socotrapotamon from Socotra Island, off the north‐east coast of Africa. Main conclusions The discrete distribution of the two subfamilies in Europe/Asia is hypothesized to be the result of vicariance due to the collision of the Indian tectonic plate with the Asian continent, and the orogeny that caused the separation of the two freshwater crab lineages around 22.8 Ma. Within the Potamiscinae, the ‘Sunda Shelf islands’ subclade separated from other potamiscines around 21.1 Ma; and the endemic fauna of the East Asian islands (Taiwan, the Ryukyus and mainland Japan) was isolated from the Asian continent c. 8.4 Ma, following the opening of the Okinawa Trough. The ‘Socotra’ subclade diverged from the ‘eastern Asia’ subclade at 19.1 Ma during the Miocene. Its taxonomic position, however, remains unclear as the members of this clade possess the key potamine character of a transverse ridge on thoracic sternite 8, suggesting that this may in fact be a relict potamid group. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Biogeography Wiley

The collision of the Indian plate with Asia: molecular evidence for its impact on the phylogeny of freshwater crabs (Brachyura: Potamidae)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-collision-of-the-indian-plate-with-asia-molecular-evidence-for-its-0hJUXjf4Ro
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0305-0270
eISSN
1365-2699
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2699.2008.02024.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim We used molecular data to answer the following questions: (1) Is morphology‐based (and to some extent, geography‐based) classification of the freshwater crab family Potamidae congruent with a molecular phylogeny? (2) What historical biogeographical event could have shaped this phylogeny? Location Material from the entire geographical range of the family Potamidae was analysed, including specimens from East Asia (China, Taiwan, the Ryukyus), Southeast Asia, South Asia (northern India, the Middle East and Near East), North Africa, and southern Europe. Methods Mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding 503 base pairs (excluding the variable regions) of the large subunit rRNA (16S rRNA) gene were obtained from 72 species belonging to 49 potamid genera, representing 51% of all known genera in this species‐rich family. Sequences were compared by means of phylogenetic analyses (minimum evolution, Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony) and Bayesian relaxed molecular clock estimates. Results The family Potamidae was found to be monophyletic with two major lineages, and there was support for the recognition of two mostly allopatric subfamilies, Potaminae and Potamiscinae. This is largely consistent with the current classification proposed. The ‘Potamiscinae’ clade comprised three subclades: (1) a well‐supported ‘eastern Asia’ subclade that included species from the eastern part of the range (China, Taiwan, the Ryukyus, the Philippines, Indochina, Malay Peninsula, northern India and Myanmar/Burma); (2) a weakly supported ‘Sunda Shelf islands’ subclade that included species from the larger Southeast Asian islands on the Sunda Shelf (Borneo, Sumatra and Java); and (3) a ‘Socotra’ subclade that comprised only Socotrapotamon from Socotra Island, off the north‐east coast of Africa. Main conclusions The discrete distribution of the two subfamilies in Europe/Asia is hypothesized to be the result of vicariance due to the collision of the Indian tectonic plate with the Asian continent, and the orogeny that caused the separation of the two freshwater crab lineages around 22.8 Ma. Within the Potamiscinae, the ‘Sunda Shelf islands’ subclade separated from other potamiscines around 21.1 Ma; and the endemic fauna of the East Asian islands (Taiwan, the Ryukyus and mainland Japan) was isolated from the Asian continent c. 8.4 Ma, following the opening of the Okinawa Trough. The ‘Socotra’ subclade diverged from the ‘eastern Asia’ subclade at 19.1 Ma during the Miocene. Its taxonomic position, however, remains unclear as the members of this clade possess the key potamine character of a transverse ridge on thoracic sternite 8, suggesting that this may in fact be a relict potamid group.

Journal

Journal of BiogeographyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2009

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off