The clinical anatomy of fibromyalgia

The clinical anatomy of fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by pain and a spectrum of psychological comorbidities, rendering treatment difficult, and often a financial burden. Findings regarding diagnosis, prevalence, comorbidities, and potential pathophysiological links are discussed herein. Fibromyalgia is a complex disorder and there are specific criteria that patients must meet for diagnosis, including scores on fibromyalgia questionnaires, commonalities of age, gender, menopause status, sleep disturbances, and mood symptoms. The close relationship between fibromyalgia and other chronic disorders should alert the physician to explore for comorbid illnesses. In this review of the clinical anatomy of fibromyalgia, we review new studies that could be significant for the current use of clinical interventions for patients with symptoms. Using standard search engines, the clinical anatomy of fibromyalgia is investigated and many related studies are mentioned herein. Fibromyalgia is considered a prototypical central chronic pain syndrome and is associated with widespread pain that fluctuates spontaneously. There is also substantial lifetime psychiatric comorbidity in individuals with fibromyalgia, resulting in a low health‐related quality of life. These results have important clinical and theoretical implications, including the possibility that fibromyalgia could share underlying pathophysiological links with some psychiatric disorders. This reveals that patients with fibromyalgia have findings compatible with tissue injury pain, the pain mechanisms involving both the primary afferent neuron and the nociceptive systems in the central nervous system. (1) There is a relationship between fibromyalgia and chronic disorders. This should alert the physician to explore for comorbid illnesses. (2) There is substantial lifetime psychiatric comorbidity resulting in a low health‐related quality of life. (3) Patients with fibromyalgia have findings compatible with tissue injury pain Clin. Anat. 31:387–391, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Anatomy Wiley

The clinical anatomy of fibromyalgia

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0897-3806
eISSN
1098-2353
D.O.I.
10.1002/ca.23029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by pain and a spectrum of psychological comorbidities, rendering treatment difficult, and often a financial burden. Findings regarding diagnosis, prevalence, comorbidities, and potential pathophysiological links are discussed herein. Fibromyalgia is a complex disorder and there are specific criteria that patients must meet for diagnosis, including scores on fibromyalgia questionnaires, commonalities of age, gender, menopause status, sleep disturbances, and mood symptoms. The close relationship between fibromyalgia and other chronic disorders should alert the physician to explore for comorbid illnesses. In this review of the clinical anatomy of fibromyalgia, we review new studies that could be significant for the current use of clinical interventions for patients with symptoms. Using standard search engines, the clinical anatomy of fibromyalgia is investigated and many related studies are mentioned herein. Fibromyalgia is considered a prototypical central chronic pain syndrome and is associated with widespread pain that fluctuates spontaneously. There is also substantial lifetime psychiatric comorbidity in individuals with fibromyalgia, resulting in a low health‐related quality of life. These results have important clinical and theoretical implications, including the possibility that fibromyalgia could share underlying pathophysiological links with some psychiatric disorders. This reveals that patients with fibromyalgia have findings compatible with tissue injury pain, the pain mechanisms involving both the primary afferent neuron and the nociceptive systems in the central nervous system. (1) There is a relationship between fibromyalgia and chronic disorders. This should alert the physician to explore for comorbid illnesses. (2) There is substantial lifetime psychiatric comorbidity resulting in a low health‐related quality of life. (3) Patients with fibromyalgia have findings compatible with tissue injury pain Clin. Anat. 31:387–391, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Journal

Clinical AnatomyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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