The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:” Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites

The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:” Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online... This study examines the relationship between use of Facebook, a popular online social network site, and the formation and maintenance of social capital. In addition to assessing bonding and bridging social capital, we explore a dimension of social capital that assesses one’s ability to stay connected with members of a previously inhabited community, which we call maintained social capital. Regression analyses conducted on results from a survey of undergraduate students (N = 286) suggest a strong association between use of Facebook and the three types of social capital, with the strongest relationship being to bridging social capital. In addition, Facebook usage was found to interact with measures of psychological well‐being, suggesting that it might provide greater benefits for users experiencing low self‐esteem and low life satisfaction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication Wiley

The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:” Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-benefits-of-facebook-friends-social-capital-and-college-students-kMEoFiLmVX
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
eISSN
1083-6101
DOI
10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00367.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between use of Facebook, a popular online social network site, and the formation and maintenance of social capital. In addition to assessing bonding and bridging social capital, we explore a dimension of social capital that assesses one’s ability to stay connected with members of a previously inhabited community, which we call maintained social capital. Regression analyses conducted on results from a survey of undergraduate students (N = 286) suggest a strong association between use of Facebook and the three types of social capital, with the strongest relationship being to bridging social capital. In addition, Facebook usage was found to interact with measures of psychological well‐being, suggesting that it might provide greater benefits for users experiencing low self‐esteem and low life satisfaction.

Journal

Journal of Computer-Mediated CommunicationWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2007

References

  • The Internet and social life
    Bargh, J.; McKenna, K
  • Public displays of connection
    Donath, J.; Boyd, D
  • The strength of weak ties
    Granovetter, M. S
  • Place‐based and IT mediated “community.”
    Hampton, K
  • The social context of well‐being
    Helliwell, J. F.; Putnam, R. D

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off