The Ball–Berry–Leuning and Tardieu–Davies stomatal models: synthesis and extension within a spatially aggregated picture of guard cell function

The Ball–Berry–Leuning and Tardieu–Davies stomatal models: synthesis and extension within a... A new model of stomatal conductance is proposed which combines the essential features of the Ball–Berry–Leuning (BBL) and Tardieu–Davies (TD) models within a simple spatially aggregated picture of guard cell function. The model thus provides a coherent description of stomatal responses to both air and soil environments. The model also presents some novel features not included in either the BBL or TD models: stomatal sensing of intercellular (rather than leaf surface) CO2 concentration; an explanation of all three observed regimes (A, B and C) of the stomatal response to air humidity (Monteith Plant, Cell and Environment 18, 357–364, 1995); incorporation of xylem embolism; and maintenance of hydraulic homeostasis by combined hydraulic and chemical signalling in leaves (in which leaf epidermal hydraulic conductivity plays a key role). Significantly, maintenance of hydraulic homeostasis in the model does not require a direct feedback signal from xylem embolism, the predicted minimum leaf water potential being independent of xylem hydraulic conductivity. It is suggested that stomatal regulation through combined hydraulic and chemical signalling in leaves and/or roots provides a general mechanism enabling plants to maintain their water potentials above a minimum value. Natural selection of the key stomatal parameters would then set the minimum potential to a specific value determined by the most vulnerable plant process under water stress (e.g. cell growth, protein synthesis or xylem cavitation), depending on species and growth conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

The Ball–Berry–Leuning and Tardieu–Davies stomatal models: synthesis and extension within a spatially aggregated picture of guard cell function

Plant Cell & Environment, Volume 25 (11) – Nov 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-ball-berry-leuning-and-tardieu-davies-stomatal-models-synthesis-nswpGi3bqc
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-3040.2002.00909.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A new model of stomatal conductance is proposed which combines the essential features of the Ball–Berry–Leuning (BBL) and Tardieu–Davies (TD) models within a simple spatially aggregated picture of guard cell function. The model thus provides a coherent description of stomatal responses to both air and soil environments. The model also presents some novel features not included in either the BBL or TD models: stomatal sensing of intercellular (rather than leaf surface) CO2 concentration; an explanation of all three observed regimes (A, B and C) of the stomatal response to air humidity (Monteith Plant, Cell and Environment 18, 357–364, 1995); incorporation of xylem embolism; and maintenance of hydraulic homeostasis by combined hydraulic and chemical signalling in leaves (in which leaf epidermal hydraulic conductivity plays a key role). Significantly, maintenance of hydraulic homeostasis in the model does not require a direct feedback signal from xylem embolism, the predicted minimum leaf water potential being independent of xylem hydraulic conductivity. It is suggested that stomatal regulation through combined hydraulic and chemical signalling in leaves and/or roots provides a general mechanism enabling plants to maintain their water potentials above a minimum value. Natural selection of the key stomatal parameters would then set the minimum potential to a specific value determined by the most vulnerable plant process under water stress (e.g. cell growth, protein synthesis or xylem cavitation), depending on species and growth conditions.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2002

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off