The association between different features of sleep‐disordered breathing and blood pressure: A cross‐sectional study

The association between different features of sleep‐disordered breathing and blood pressure: A... Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in patients with high blood pressure (BP). Severity of SDB can be evaluated by the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour (AHI) or by measures of hypoxia. The objective of this study was to assess the association between different measures of SDB and BP. In 134 consecutive patients, polygraphy was performed to determine the AHI. Pulse oximetry was used to determine hypoxemic burden (time below 90% oxygen saturation [T90] and hypoxia load [HL], representing the integrated area above the curve of desaturation). AHI did not correlate with systolic and diastolic BP or pulse pressure. In contrast, HL correlated with pulse pressure during the day (P = .01) and night (P = .0034) before and after adjustment for body mass index. The correlation between systolic BP and HL at night disappeared following adjustment for body mass index. This study generates the hypothesis that nocturnal hypoxemic burden may represent a suitable marker of BP pattern and a potential treatment target in hypertensive patients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Hypertension Wiley

The association between different features of sleep‐disordered breathing and blood pressure: A cross‐sectional study

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1524-6175
eISSN
1751-7176
D.O.I.
10.1111/jch.13202
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in patients with high blood pressure (BP). Severity of SDB can be evaluated by the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour (AHI) or by measures of hypoxia. The objective of this study was to assess the association between different measures of SDB and BP. In 134 consecutive patients, polygraphy was performed to determine the AHI. Pulse oximetry was used to determine hypoxemic burden (time below 90% oxygen saturation [T90] and hypoxia load [HL], representing the integrated area above the curve of desaturation). AHI did not correlate with systolic and diastolic BP or pulse pressure. In contrast, HL correlated with pulse pressure during the day (P = .01) and night (P = .0034) before and after adjustment for body mass index. The correlation between systolic BP and HL at night disappeared following adjustment for body mass index. This study generates the hypothesis that nocturnal hypoxemic burden may represent a suitable marker of BP pattern and a potential treatment target in hypertensive patients.

Journal

Journal of Clinical HypertensionWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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