THE ASA FRAMEWORK: AN UPDATE

THE ASA FRAMEWORK: AN UPDATE In 1987, B. Schneider proposed a person‐oriented model of organizational behavior based on the proposition that it is the collective characteristics of people who define an organization. He further proposed that, over time, organizations become defined by the persons in them as a natural outcome of an attraction‐selection‐attrition (ASA) cycle. We provide a brief overview of the ASA cycle and review literature relevant to two facets of the theory. The literature reviewed provides some indirect support for the proposal that founders and the members of top management have long‐term effects on organizations through the ASA cycle. The literature reviewed provides both indirect and direct evidence supporting a central proposition of ASA theory–that organizations over time become relatively homogeneous with regard to the kinds of people in them. Suggestions for future research on ASA are presented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1995.tb01780.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1987, B. Schneider proposed a person‐oriented model of organizational behavior based on the proposition that it is the collective characteristics of people who define an organization. He further proposed that, over time, organizations become defined by the persons in them as a natural outcome of an attraction‐selection‐attrition (ASA) cycle. We provide a brief overview of the ASA cycle and review literature relevant to two facets of the theory. The literature reviewed provides some indirect support for the proposal that founders and the members of top management have long‐term effects on organizations through the ASA cycle. The literature reviewed provides both indirect and direct evidence supporting a central proposition of ASA theory–that organizations over time become relatively homogeneous with regard to the kinds of people in them. Suggestions for future research on ASA are presented.

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1995

References

  • Do the people make the place: An examination of the attraction‐selection‐attrition hypothesis
    Bretz, Bretz; Ash, Ash; Dreher, Dreher
  • Pay preferences and job search decisions: A person‐organization fit perspective
    Cable, Cable; Judge, Judge
  • Problems with the use of profile similarity indices in the study of congruence in organizational research
    Edwards, Edwards
  • Testing Schneider's ASA theory
    Jordan, Jordan; Herriott, Herriott; Chalmers, Chalmers
  • Person‐situation selection: A review of some ability‐situation interaction research
    Schneider, Schneider
  • An exploratory examination of person‐organization fit: Organizational goal congruence
    Vancouver, Vancouver; Schmitt, Schmitt

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