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The adaptive—innovative (A—I) cognitive styles of male and female project managers: Some implications for the management of change

The adaptive—innovative (A—I) cognitive styles of male and female project managers: Some... This paper reports for the first time the results of a study of the adaptive–innovative cognitive style of the managers of change projects. The Kirton Adaption–Innovation Inventory (KAI) was completed by 133 such managers and the mean KAI score of 109.4 (SD = 14.0) indicates a preferred innovative approach to making decisions and solving problems when managing projects involving significant change. This result is consistent with those of other studies which have shown that activities which involve working across functional boundaries in organizations are generally undertaken by those with an innovative cognitive style (Foxall, 1990; Foxall & Hackett, 1994; Kirton, 1980, 1994). The implications of these results for change project managers are discussed in terms of the interpersonal problems which can arise when working with client managers who are likely to have a more adaptive cognitive style. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology Wiley

The adaptive—innovative (A—I) cognitive styles of male and female project managers: Some implications for the management of change

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1995 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0963-1798
eISSN
2044-8325
DOI
10.1111/j.2044-8325.1995.tb00593.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper reports for the first time the results of a study of the adaptive–innovative cognitive style of the managers of change projects. The Kirton Adaption–Innovation Inventory (KAI) was completed by 133 such managers and the mean KAI score of 109.4 (SD = 14.0) indicates a preferred innovative approach to making decisions and solving problems when managing projects involving significant change. This result is consistent with those of other studies which have shown that activities which involve working across functional boundaries in organizations are generally undertaken by those with an innovative cognitive style (Foxall, 1990; Foxall & Hackett, 1994; Kirton, 1980, 1994). The implications of these results for change project managers are discussed in terms of the interpersonal problems which can arise when working with client managers who are likely to have a more adaptive cognitive style.

Journal

Journal of Occupational and Organizational PsychologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1995

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