TEXTURAL DETERIORATION OF RED HAKE AND HADDOCK MUSCLE IN FROZEN STORAGE AS RELATED TO CHEMICAL PARAMETERS AND CHANGES IN THE MYOFIBRILLAR PROTEINS

TEXTURAL DETERIORATION OF RED HAKE AND HADDOCK MUSCLE IN FROZEN STORAGE AS RELATED TO CHEMICAL... ABSTRACT The present study involved the measurement of fish muscle texture by both objective and subjective means. Reliable methods for the evaluation of fish texture as well as interpretation of results are discussed. The study demonstrated that significant correlations between the methods could be achieved if carefully controlled conditions were maintained. The presence of dimethylamine in frozen hake (Urophycis chuss) appeared to be a good chemical indicator of toughness whereas the extractable protein nitrogen was not as reliable. Data suggest that although the enzymatic formation of formaldehyde was a major factor in the toughening of red hake, other factors probably contribute to the textural deterioration observed during cold storage. It is evident that haddock (Melunogrammus aeglefinus) toughens when stored at relatively high temperatures (‐5°C) and like hake, experiences a loss of water‐holding capacity although no formaldehyde accumulates in the tissues. The molecular basis of toughening in fish was examined by SDS gel electrophoresis. Apparently, the formaldehyde produced by the TMAO‐ase enzyme system in red hake resulted in the covalent cross linking of troponin and myosin light chains, forming higher molecular weight aggregates. Changes at the molecular level were not detected by this method in haddock. Textural changes in this species are not as pronounced as those of hake and are most likely due to secondary bonds such as hydrogen or electrostatic. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Science Wiley

TEXTURAL DETERIORATION OF RED HAKE AND HADDOCK MUSCLE IN FROZEN STORAGE AS RELATED TO CHEMICAL PARAMETERS AND CHANGES IN THE MYOFIBRILLAR PROTEINS

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/textural-deterioration-of-red-hake-and-haddock-muscle-in-frozen-TVmZ3goldb
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1147
eISSN
1750-3841
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2621.1979.tb08470.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT The present study involved the measurement of fish muscle texture by both objective and subjective means. Reliable methods for the evaluation of fish texture as well as interpretation of results are discussed. The study demonstrated that significant correlations between the methods could be achieved if carefully controlled conditions were maintained. The presence of dimethylamine in frozen hake (Urophycis chuss) appeared to be a good chemical indicator of toughness whereas the extractable protein nitrogen was not as reliable. Data suggest that although the enzymatic formation of formaldehyde was a major factor in the toughening of red hake, other factors probably contribute to the textural deterioration observed during cold storage. It is evident that haddock (Melunogrammus aeglefinus) toughens when stored at relatively high temperatures (‐5°C) and like hake, experiences a loss of water‐holding capacity although no formaldehyde accumulates in the tissues. The molecular basis of toughening in fish was examined by SDS gel electrophoresis. Apparently, the formaldehyde produced by the TMAO‐ase enzyme system in red hake resulted in the covalent cross linking of troponin and myosin light chains, forming higher molecular weight aggregates. Changes at the molecular level were not detected by this method in haddock. Textural changes in this species are not as pronounced as those of hake and are most likely due to secondary bonds such as hydrogen or electrostatic.

Journal

Journal of Food ScienceWiley

Published: May 1, 1979

References

  • Metal‐catalyzed lipid oxidation and changes of proteins in fish
    Castell, Castell
  • Myofibril fragmentation and shear resistance of three bovine muscles during postmortem storage
    Olson, Olson; Parrish, Parrish; Stromer, Stromer
  • Predicting meat tenderness from muscle tensile properties
    Stanley, Stanley; McKnight, McKnight; Hines, Hines; Osborne, Osborne; DeMan, DeMan

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off