Tension changes in the cat soleus muscle following slow stretch or shortening of the contracting muscle

Tension changes in the cat soleus muscle following slow stretch or shortening of the contracting... The permanent extra tension after a stretch and the deficit of tension after a shortening in the soleus muscle of the anaesthetised cat were measured using distributed nerve stimulation across five channels. At low rates of stimulation the optimum length for a contraction was several millimetres longer than that when higher rates of stimulation were used, so that movements applied over the same length range could be on the descending limb of the full activation curve but on the ascending limb of the submaximal activation curve. The extra tension after stretch and the depression after shortening were present only near the peak and on the descending limb of the length‐tension curve. Effects on final tension of changing the speed and amplitude of stretches or shortenings were found to be small. Statistical analysis showed that variations in the tension excess or deficit due to changing stimulus rate could be entirely attributed to the effect of stimulus rate on the length‐tension relation, as when length was expressed relative to optimum for each rate, stimulus rate was no longer a significant determinant of the tension excess or deficit. The extra tension after stretch and the depression after shortening disappeared if stimulation was interrupted and tension briefly fell to zero. These effects were explained in terms of a non‐uniform distribution of sarcomere length changes at long muscle lengths. During stretch some sarcomeres are stretched to beyond overlap while others lengthen hardly at all. During shortening some sarcomeres shorten much further than others. These mechanisms have important implications for exercise physiology and sports medicine. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiology Wiley

Tension changes in the cat soleus muscle following slow stretch or shortening of the contracting muscle

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/tension-changes-in-the-cat-soleus-muscle-following-slow-stretch-or-LxpF2awzyj
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3751
eISSN
1469-7793
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-7793.2000.t01-2-00503.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The permanent extra tension after a stretch and the deficit of tension after a shortening in the soleus muscle of the anaesthetised cat were measured using distributed nerve stimulation across five channels. At low rates of stimulation the optimum length for a contraction was several millimetres longer than that when higher rates of stimulation were used, so that movements applied over the same length range could be on the descending limb of the full activation curve but on the ascending limb of the submaximal activation curve. The extra tension after stretch and the depression after shortening were present only near the peak and on the descending limb of the length‐tension curve. Effects on final tension of changing the speed and amplitude of stretches or shortenings were found to be small. Statistical analysis showed that variations in the tension excess or deficit due to changing stimulus rate could be entirely attributed to the effect of stimulus rate on the length‐tension relation, as when length was expressed relative to optimum for each rate, stimulus rate was no longer a significant determinant of the tension excess or deficit. The extra tension after stretch and the depression after shortening disappeared if stimulation was interrupted and tension briefly fell to zero. These effects were explained in terms of a non‐uniform distribution of sarcomere length changes at long muscle lengths. During stretch some sarcomeres are stretched to beyond overlap while others lengthen hardly at all. During shortening some sarcomeres shorten much further than others. These mechanisms have important implications for exercise physiology and sports medicine.

Journal

The Journal of PhysiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2000

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month