Ten years of free‐air CO 2 enrichment altered the mobilization of N from soil in Lolium perenne L. swards

Ten years of free‐air CO 2 enrichment altered the mobilization of N from soil in Lolium perenne... Effects of free‐air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE, 60 Pa pCO2) on plant growth as compared with ambient pCO2 (36 Pa) were studied in swards of Lolium perenne L. (perennial ryegrass) at two levels of N fertilization (14 and 56 g m−2 a−1) from 1993 to 2002. The objectives were to determine how plant growth responded to the availability of C and N in the long term and how the supply of N to the plant from the two sources of N in the soil, soil organic matter (SOM) and mineral fertilizer, varied over time. In three field experiments, 15N‐labelled fertilizer was used to distinguish the sources of available N. In 1993, harvestable biomass under elevated pCO2 was 7% higher than under ambient pCO2. This relative pCO2 response increased to 32% in 2002 at high N, but remained low at low N. Between 1993 and 2002, the proportions and amounts of N in harvestable biomass derived from SOM (excluding remobilized fertilizer) were, at high N, increasingly higher at elevated pCO2 than at ambient pCO2. Two factorial experiments confirmed that at high N, but not at low N, a higher proportion of N in harvestable biomass was derived from soil (including remobilized fertilizer) following 7 and 9 years of elevated pCO2, when compared with ambient pCO2. It is suggested that N availability in the soil initially limited the pCO2 response of harvestable biomass. At high N, the limitation of plant growth decreased over time as a result of the stimulated mobilization of N from soil, especially from SOM. Consequently, harvestable biomass increasingly responded to elevated pCO2. The underlying mechanisms which contributed to the increased mobilization of N from SOM under elevated pCO2 are discussed. This study demonstrated that there are feedback mechanisms in the soil which are only revealed during long‐term field experiments. Such investigations are thus, a prerequisite for understanding the responses of ecosystems to elevated pCO2 and N supply. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Change Biology Wiley

Ten years of free‐air CO 2 enrichment altered the mobilization of N from soil in Lolium perenne L. swards

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1354-1013
eISSN
1365-2486
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2486.2004.00803.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Effects of free‐air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE, 60 Pa pCO2) on plant growth as compared with ambient pCO2 (36 Pa) were studied in swards of Lolium perenne L. (perennial ryegrass) at two levels of N fertilization (14 and 56 g m−2 a−1) from 1993 to 2002. The objectives were to determine how plant growth responded to the availability of C and N in the long term and how the supply of N to the plant from the two sources of N in the soil, soil organic matter (SOM) and mineral fertilizer, varied over time. In three field experiments, 15N‐labelled fertilizer was used to distinguish the sources of available N. In 1993, harvestable biomass under elevated pCO2 was 7% higher than under ambient pCO2. This relative pCO2 response increased to 32% in 2002 at high N, but remained low at low N. Between 1993 and 2002, the proportions and amounts of N in harvestable biomass derived from SOM (excluding remobilized fertilizer) were, at high N, increasingly higher at elevated pCO2 than at ambient pCO2. Two factorial experiments confirmed that at high N, but not at low N, a higher proportion of N in harvestable biomass was derived from soil (including remobilized fertilizer) following 7 and 9 years of elevated pCO2, when compared with ambient pCO2. It is suggested that N availability in the soil initially limited the pCO2 response of harvestable biomass. At high N, the limitation of plant growth decreased over time as a result of the stimulated mobilization of N from soil, especially from SOM. Consequently, harvestable biomass increasingly responded to elevated pCO2. The underlying mechanisms which contributed to the increased mobilization of N from SOM under elevated pCO2 are discussed. This study demonstrated that there are feedback mechanisms in the soil which are only revealed during long‐term field experiments. Such investigations are thus, a prerequisite for understanding the responses of ecosystems to elevated pCO2 and N supply.

Journal

Global Change BiologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2004

References

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