Telephone Follow‐Up for Older Adults Discharged to Home from the Emergency Department: A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial

Telephone Follow‐Up for Older Adults Discharged to Home from the Emergency Department: A... In the first few months after discharge from the emergency department (ED), adults aged 65 and older are at risk of adverse events, including rapid return to the ED, hospitalization, decline in capacity to perform activities of daily living (ADLs), and death. These outcomes may stem from inadequate care transitions from the ED, including poor communication of discharge instructions, delays in return appointments to a primary care physician (PCP), and unrecognized signs of complications. So strong is the belief that better discharge planning can improve the quality of aftercare for individuals recently discharged from the ED that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services proposed rules in 2015 to apply discharge planning requirements to individuals being discharged from the ED. As the number of older adults seeking care in EDs has increased rapidly, and the U.S. healthcare system has emphasized avoidance of repeat admissions and ED visits, these poor outcomes after discharge from an ED have become a focus of concern.Numerous healthcare systems have searched for practical ways to provide better care after discharge from the hospital or ED. Telephone calls have been recognized as a feasible and relatively inexpensive way to communicate in the critical early post‐ED discharge http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Geriatrics Society Wiley

Telephone Follow‐Up for Older Adults Discharged to Home from the Emergency Department: A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 American Geriatrics Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0002-8614
eISSN
1532-5415
D.O.I.
10.1111/jgs.15142
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the first few months after discharge from the emergency department (ED), adults aged 65 and older are at risk of adverse events, including rapid return to the ED, hospitalization, decline in capacity to perform activities of daily living (ADLs), and death. These outcomes may stem from inadequate care transitions from the ED, including poor communication of discharge instructions, delays in return appointments to a primary care physician (PCP), and unrecognized signs of complications. So strong is the belief that better discharge planning can improve the quality of aftercare for individuals recently discharged from the ED that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services proposed rules in 2015 to apply discharge planning requirements to individuals being discharged from the ED. As the number of older adults seeking care in EDs has increased rapidly, and the U.S. healthcare system has emphasized avoidance of repeat admissions and ED visits, these poor outcomes after discharge from an ED have become a focus of concern.Numerous healthcare systems have searched for practical ways to provide better care after discharge from the hospital or ED. Telephone calls have been recognized as a feasible and relatively inexpensive way to communicate in the critical early post‐ED discharge

Journal

Journal of American Geriatrics SocietyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ;

References

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